Plato

Plato was a classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world.

Books

This list of books are ONLY the books that have been ranked on the lists that are aggregated on this site. This is not a comprehensive list of all books by this author.

  1. 1. The Republic

    "The Republic" is a philosophical text that explores the concepts of justice, order, and character within the context of a just city-state and a just individual. It presents the idea of a utopian society ruled by philosopher-kings, who are the most wise and just. The dialogue also delves into theories of education, the nature of reality, and the role of the philosopher in society. It is a fundamental work in Western philosophy and political theory.

    The 143rd Greatest Book of All Time
  2. 2. The Complete Works of Plato

    This comprehensive collection compiles the philosophical works of an influential Classical Greek philosopher. The book includes his dialogues, letters, and philosophical musings, exploring topics such as justice, beauty, truth, mathematics, politics, love, and virtue. The philosopher's ideas, including the theory of forms, the allegory of the cave, and the philosopher king, have had a profound impact on Western thought and continue to be studied and debated in modern philosophical and academic circles.

    The 360th Greatest Book of All Time
  3. 3. Symposium

    In "Symposium", a group of notable men including philosophers, playwrights, and politicians gather at a banquet and decide to each give a speech in praise of the god of love. Each speech presents a different perspective on love, ranging from the purely physical to the spiritual. The dialogue culminates with the speech of Socrates, who presents a philosophical view of love as a means of ascending to contemplation of the divine.

    The 857th Greatest Book of All Time
  4. 4. Apology

    This philosophical text is a dialogue of Socrates' defense in 399 BC against the charges of 'corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel.' The dialogue is Socrates' defense at his trial and is his final public statement before his execution. In it, he discusses the moral and philosophical justification for his actions and beliefs, ultimately leading to his conviction and death.

    The 954th Greatest Book of All Time
  5. 5. Phaedo

    "Phaedo" is a philosophical dialogue that takes place in ancient Greece, where the main character, a philosopher, is awaiting his execution. The story is a discussion on the nature of the afterlife, the immortality of the soul, and the theory of forms. The philosopher argues that the soul is immortal and that we should not fear death. He also discusses his theory of forms, stating that the world we perceive is merely a shadow of the true world of forms. The dialogue ends with the philosopher calmly accepting his fate, illustrating his belief in the immortality of the soul.

    The 992nd Greatest Book of All Time
  6. 6. Crito

    "Crito" is a philosophical dialogue where the main character, a renowned philosopher, is in prison awaiting execution and is visited by his friend, Crito, who urges him to escape. The philosopher argues that since the laws of Athens have given him life, education, and many other benefits, it would be unjust for him to break those laws by escaping. The dialogue explores themes of justice, law, obligation, and the social contract.

    The 1555th Greatest Book of All Time
  7. 7. Euthyphro

    "Euthyphro" is a philosophical dialogue that takes place in the weeks leading up to the trial of Socrates, where Socrates and Euthyphro engage in a conversation about the nature of piety. The dialogue begins with Socrates questioning Euthyphro about his decision to prosecute his own father for the murder of a slave. This leads to a discussion about what is considered holy and the nature of the gods. Despite their lengthy conversation, the two philosophers never arrive at a definitive answer, leaving the question of what constitutes true piety unresolved.

    The 1987th Greatest Book of All Time
  8. 8. Phaedrus

    Phaedrus is a Socratic dialogue that discusses topics such as love, the nature of the soul, and the art of rhetoric. The narrative begins with a myth about the chariot of the soul, then moves on to a discussion about the nature of love, particularly focusing on the concept of divine madness. The dialogue then transitions into a discussion about rhetoric and writing, debating the merits and pitfalls of both. The dialogue concludes with a critique of the art of rhetoric, arguing that true rhetoric must be based on truth and knowledge rather than manipulation and deceit.

    The 2782nd Greatest Book of All Time