Hermann Hesse

Hermann Hesse was a German-Swiss poet, novelist, and painter. He is best known for his novels 'Steppenwolf', 'Siddhartha', and 'The Glass Bead Game', which explore themes of self-discovery and spirituality. Hesse received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946.

Books

This list of books are ONLY the books that have been ranked on the lists that are aggregated on this site. This is not a comprehensive list of all books by this author.

  1. 1. Steppenwolf

    The novel presents a poignant exploration of a man's struggle with his dual nature. The protagonist, a middle-aged man, finds himself torn between his humanistic, intellectual tendencies and his more primitive, wolf-like instincts. As he navigates his way through the surreal and sometimes hallucinatory world, he encounters various characters who challenge his views and push him towards self-discovery and transformation. The narrative delves into themes of alienation, the subconscious mind, and the search for meaning in life.

    The 148th Greatest Book of All Time
  2. 2. Siddhartha

    "Siddhartha" is a novel about the spiritual journey of a young man named Siddhartha during the time of Gautama Buddha. Born into an Indian Brahmin family, Siddhartha rejects his privileged life to seek spiritual enlightenment. His journey takes him through periods of harsh asceticism, sensual indulgence, material wealth, and finally, to the simple life of a ferryman on a river where he finds peace and wisdom. The book explores themes of self-discovery, spiritual quest, and the desire for a meaningful life.

    The 239th Greatest Book of All Time
  3. 3. The Glass Bead Game

    Set in the 23rd century, the novel revolves around a highly intellectual game, the Glass Bead Game, which incorporates all fields of human and cosmic knowledge. The story follows the life of Joseph Knecht, a scholar who becomes a Magister Ludi (Master of the Game). The book explores his life and thoughts, including his relationships with others and his questioning of the values of his society. The narrative is a profound exploration of human life, knowledge, and spirituality.

    The 394th Greatest Book of All Time
  4. 4. Demian

    The novel follows the life of a young man, Emil Sinclair, from childhood to adulthood, as he navigates the duality of his nature and the societal expectations of his time. He is influenced by a charismatic and intellectual peer, Max Demian, who introduces him to the concept of the world not as a dichotomy of good and evil, but as a unified whole. This leads Sinclair on a journey of self-discovery and spiritual enlightenment, exploring themes of identity, morality, and the subconscious. The narrative is heavily influenced by the philosophies of Carl Jung and the Gnostic tradition.

    The 1654th Greatest Book of All Time
  5. 5. Narcissus And Goldmund

    The novel explores the complex friendship between two diametrically opposed characters: one, a cerebral and ascetic monk dedicated to a life of contemplation and spiritual discipline, and the other, a passionate and sensual artist driven by the pursuit of beauty and worldly experiences. Set against the backdrop of medieval Europe, the story delves into themes of duality, the search for meaning, and the reconciliation of the spiritual with the carnal. As the two men journey through their lives, their intertwined paths lead them to profound insights about the nature of human existence, creativity, and the eternal struggle between the intellect and the senses.

    The 1691st Greatest Book of All Time
  6. 6. Beneath The Wheel

    "Beneath The Wheel" follows the story of Hans Giebenrath, a talented and ambitious young student who is sent to a prestigious boarding school. As he becomes consumed by the pressures of academic success and the expectations of his teachers and parents, Hans gradually loses touch with his own desires and passions. The novel explores themes of conformity, the damaging effects of excessive pressure, and the consequences of sacrificing one's individuality for societal approval.

    The 8745th Greatest Book of All Time