The Greatest New Zealander, Italian Books of All Time

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This list represents a comprehensive and trusted collection of the greatest books. Developed through a specialized algorithm, it brings together 268 'best of' book lists to form a definitive guide to the world's most acclaimed books. For those interested in how these books are chosen, additional details can be found on the rankings page.

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  1. 1. The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri

    In this epic poem, the protagonist embarks on an extraordinary journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso). Guided by the ancient Roman poet Virgil and his beloved Beatrice, he encounters various historical and mythological figures in each realm, witnessing the eternal consequences of earthly sins and virtues. The journey serves as an allegory for the soul's progression towards God, offering profound insights into the nature of good and evil, free will, and divine justice.

  2. 2. The Leopard by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa

    "The Leopard" is a historical novel set in 19th-century Sicily, during the time of the Italian unification or Risorgimento. It centers on an aging, aristocratic protagonist who is coming to terms with the decline of his class and the rise of a new social order. The narrative weaves together personal drama with the larger political and social upheaval of the time, providing a rich, nuanced portrait of a society in transition. Despite his resistance to change, the protagonist ultimately recognizes its inevitability and the futility of his efforts to preserve the old ways.

  3. 3. The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli

    This classic work of political philosophy provides a pragmatic guide on political leadership and power, arguing that leaders must do whatever necessary to maintain authority and protect their states, even if it means compromising morality and ethics. The book explores various types of principalities, military affairs, the conduct of great leaders, and the virtues a prince should possess. It is known for its controversial thesis, which suggests that the ends justify the means in politics.

  4. 4. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco

    Set in a wealthy Italian monastery in the 14th century, the novel follows a Franciscan friar and his young apprentice as they investigate a series of mysterious deaths within the monastery. As they navigate the labyrinthine library and decipher cryptic manuscripts, they uncover a complex plot involving forbidden books, secret societies, and the Inquisition. The novel is a blend of historical fiction, mystery, and philosophical exploration, delving into themes of truth, knowledge, and the power of the written word.

  5. 5. Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio

    "Decameron" is a collection of 100 stories told by a group of seven young women and three young men sheltering in a secluded villa just outside Florence to escape the Black Death, which was afflicting the city. The tales, which range from the erotic to the tragic, the hilarious to the instructional, are embedded in a rich framework narrative that provides a detailed portrait of the society of the Italian Renaissance.

  6. 6. Confessions of Zeno by Italo Svevo

    "Confessions of Zeno" is a satirical, semi-autobiographical novel that follows the life of Zeno Cosini, a neurotic Italian businessman, as he tries to quit smoking. The book is presented as a diary, written at the suggestion of Zeno's psychoanalyst, and it details Zeno's thoughts on his health, his family, his business ventures, and his infatuation with a beautiful woman. Throughout the story, Zeno's attempts to quit smoking serve as a metaphor for his struggles with his personal weaknesses and his quest for self-understanding.

  7. 7. If This Is a Man by Primo Levi

    This book is a deeply moving and insightful memoir of a survivor of Auschwitz, a Nazi concentration camp during World War II. The author, an Italian Jew, provides a detailed account of his life in the camp, the brutal conditions, the dehumanization, and the struggle for survival. The narrative is a profound exploration of the human spirit, resilience, and the will to live, despite unimaginable horror and suffering. It also raises profound questions about humanity, morality, and the capacity for evil.

  8. 8. If on a Winter's Night a Traveller by Italo Calvino

    The novel is a postmodernist narrative that follows the adventures of the reader, who is trying to read a book called "If on a Winter's Night a Traveller." However, the reader keeps encountering obstacles that prevent him from finishing the book, including printer's errors, censorship, and interruptions from other characters. The story is interspersed with the beginnings of ten different novels, each interrupted at a moment of suspense. The book is a meditation on reading, writing, and the nature of narrative itself.

  9. 9. Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino

    In this unique novel, a Venetian traveler describes 55 different cities to the Mongol emperor, each city more fantastical and surreal than the last. The cities are divided into categories such as "Cities and Memory," "Cities and Desire," "Cities and Signs," etc. As the traveler continues to describe these cities, it becomes clear that they are all actually the same city, Venice, seen from different perspectives and points in time. The novel explores themes of memory, perception, and the nature of human experience.

  10. 10. The Tartar Steppe by Dino Buzzati

    The novel follows a young officer who spends his entire life waiting for an attack that never comes at a remote desert outpost. The protagonist's life is consumed by the monotonous routine and the fear of the unknown, reflecting on the human condition and the dread of the passage of time. The desert symbolizes the emptiness and futility of life, while the constant anticipation of a foreign invasion that never happens represents the anxiety and fear of death.

  11. 11. The Betrothed by Alessandro Manzoni

    "The Betrothed" is a historical novel set in Lombardy, Italy during the 17th century, in the midst of political and religious turmoil. The story follows the journey of two peasants, Renzo and Lucia, who are in love and wish to marry. However, their plans are thwarted by a corrupt local baron who desires Lucia for himself, and a cowardly priest who refuses to stand up to the baron. The couple are forced to flee, facing numerous hardships and adventures, while their faith and love for each other are continually tested. The novel explores themes of love, faith, and the struggle for justice.

  12. 12. Six Characters in Search of an Author by Luigi Pirandello

    In this metatheatrical play, six characters come to life and demand that a theater director tell their tragic story, which was left incomplete by their author. As the director and his actors interact with these characters, the boundaries between fiction and reality blur, leading to a philosophical exploration of the nature of human identity, the reliability of art, and the unreliability of perception. The characters' story, involving a complex web of familial relationships, adultery, and suicide, further complicates the narrative, challenging the audience's understanding of truth and illusion.

  13. 13. The Baron in the Trees by Italo Calvino

    "The Baron in the Trees" tells the story of a young Italian nobleman who, in a fit of rebellion, climbs a tree and vows never to touch the ground again. He spends the rest of his life living in the treetops, observing the world from above, and engaging in adventures with bandits, revolutionaries, and lovers. Despite his self-imposed exile, he becomes a symbol of freedom and individuality, ultimately influencing the course of European history.

  14. 14. The Moon and the Bonfires by Cesare Pavese

    The story follows a man who, after making a fortune in America, returns to his small hometown in Italy after World War II. He finds the place significantly changed, with many of his old friends either dead or drastically different. As he tries to reconcile his memories with the new reality, he also grapples with his own identity and the impact of the war on his home. The narrative explores themes of change, identity, and the lasting effects of war.

  15. 15. The Garden of the Finzi-Continis by Giorgio Bassani

    Set in Ferrara, Italy during the late 1930s, the book tells the story of the Finzi-Continis, a wealthy, aristocratic Jewish family who live in a secluded mansion with a beautiful, walled garden. The narrator, a young middle-class Jew, becomes infatuated with the family's daughter, Micoleta. As the Fascist regime's anti-Jewish laws become increasingly oppressive, the idyllic garden becomes a sanctuary for the local Jewish community, including the narrator. Despite the looming threat of the Holocaust, the family remains oblivious to their impending fate, leading to a tragic end.

  16. 16. History by Elsa Morante

    "History" is a novel set in Rome during World War II and the post-war period, focusing on the life of a widowed schoolteacher and her young son. The narrative explores the struggles of the impoverished family against the backdrop of war, including the Nazi occupation of Rome, the Allied bombing, and the rise of Fascism. The book also delves into the themes of love, loss, and survival, offering a poignant depiction of the human condition.

  17. 17. Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems by Galileo

    This scientific work presents a series of discussions between three characters, each representing a different perspective on the cosmological theories of the time. Throughout the dialogue, the characters debate the merits of the Ptolemaic geocentric system, which asserts that the Earth is the center of the universe, and the Copernican heliocentric system, which proposes that the Sun is the center. The author uses these discussions to subtly argue in favor of the Copernican system, challenging the traditional religious and scientific beliefs of his time.

  18. 18. If Not Now, When? by Primo Levi

    This novel follows a band of Jewish partisans behind German lines during World War II. They are a diverse group from different countries and social backgrounds, all brought together by the common goal of sabotaging the Nazi war effort and surviving the Holocaust. The narrative explores their various experiences, the challenges they face, their acts of resistance, and their hopes for a future free from oppression. The title reflects the urgent necessity of their mission and their determination to fight back against their persecutors.

  19. 19. Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco

    This novel follows three intellectual friends who work at a small publishing house. As a joke, they start inventing a conspiracy theory about a secret society that has been manipulating world events for centuries. However, as they delve deeper into their own fabrication, they begin to lose sight of what's real and what's not. Their lives take a dangerous turn when actual secret societies believe they hold the key to a universal secret and will stop at nothing to obtain it.

  20. 20. Complete Poems of Giacomo Leopardi by Giacomo Leopardi

    This book is a comprehensive collection of the poetic works of a renowned Italian poet. The poems cover a wide range of themes, from love and nature to philosophy and social issues, showcasing the poet's profound understanding of human nature and the world. The collection also includes his celebrated "Canti" and other lesser-known works, all presented in their original Italian language, making it a valuable resource for those interested in Italian literature and culture.

  21. 21. History of My Life by Giacomo Casanova

    "History of My Life" is an autobiography of an Italian adventurer and author, who is best remembered for his often complicated and elaborate affairs with women. The book offers a fascinating insight into his life, travels, and encounters. It provides an intimate look at the social customs and life of the 18th century, as well as the author's personal philosophies on a variety of subjects, including love, luck, and the importance of maintaining a sense of humor.

  22. 22. The Bone People by Keri Hulme

    "The Bone People" is a complex, emotional novel that explores the lives of three characters - a reclusive artist, a young mute boy, and his adoptive father - in New Zealand. The narrative delves into themes such as Maori culture, love, violence, and isolation while showcasing the struggle of these individuals as they try to form a family unit despite their personal traumas and societal pressures. The book's unique blend of prose and poetry, along with its blend of English and Maori language, adds to its depth and richness.

  23. 23. Summa Theologica by Thomas Aquinas

    This comprehensive text is a seminal work in the field of theology, written by a prominent medieval philosopher and theologian. The book is structured in a question-and-answer format, tackling complex philosophical and theological issues such as the existence of God, the nature of man, the purpose of life, and the intricacies of morality and ethics. It is one of the most influential works in Western thought, particularly in Christian theology and philosophy, and continues to be a vital reference in these fields.

  24. 24. I Malavoglia by Giovanni Verga

    "I Malavoglia" is a tragic tale of a poor Sicilian family who struggles to maintain their dignity and values in the face of poverty, death, and societal pressure. The family's patriarch is determined to keep their ancestral home and to improve their lot through hard work and sacrifice. However, their efforts are thwarted by a series of unfortunate events, including the loss of their fishing boat, the death of family members, and the dishonor of their only daughter. Despite these hardships, the family perseveres, embodying the resilience and determination of the Sicilian people.

  25. 25. My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante

    This novel tells the story of two friends, Elena and Lila, growing up in a poor neighborhood in Naples, Italy in the 1950s. Their intense, complicated friendship is marked by competition, mutual respect, and deep affection. As they navigate the challenges of adolescence, including family drama, academic struggles, and romantic entanglements, their bond is tested and transformed. The narrative explores themes of female friendship, social class, education, and the struggle for personal autonomy in a patriarchal society.

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