The Greatest Irish, British "Dark Humor, Fiction" Books Since 2000

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This list represents a comprehensive and trusted collection of the greatest books. Developed through a specialized algorithm, it brings together 313 'best of' book lists to form a definitive guide to the world's most acclaimed books. For those interested in how these books are chosen, additional details can be found on the rankings page.

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Dark Humor

Dark humor is a genre of literature that combines humor with themes and subjects that are typically considered taboo, morbid, or controversial. It often involves making light of serious or disturbing topics such as death, violence, and mental illness. Dark humor can be used to satirize societal norms and conventions, challenge the status quo, and provide a unique perspective on the human condition. Books in this category may be unsettling or uncomfortable to read, but they offer a unique and often thought-provoking perspective on the world around us.

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  1. 1. Vernon God Little by DBC Pierre

    The book revolves around the life of a 15-year-old boy, Vernon Little, living in a small town in Texas. After a horrific school shooting where his best friend kills 16 of their classmates before committing suicide, Vernon becomes the prime suspect. With the media and law enforcement on his tail, he attempts to escape to Mexico, resulting in a series of unfortunate events and dark comedic situations. The narrative is a biting satire of America's obsession with fame and the justice system.

    The 6853rd Greatest Book of All Time
  2. 2. How The Dead Live by Will Self

    This novel presents a unique and imaginative exploration of the afterlife, where the protagonist, a recently deceased middle-aged American woman, finds herself in a surreal version of London. In this otherworldly place, she is accompanied by a peculiar guide and is forced to confront the successes and failures of her life, her relationships with her family, and the impact of her choices. The narrative delves into themes of mortality, the meaning of existence, and the complexities of the human condition, all while maintaining a darkly comedic tone. Through its vividly imaginative setting and introspective journey, the story offers a thought-provoking look at what might lie beyond death, challenging readers to reflect on their own lives and the nature of the afterlife.

    The 7645th Greatest Book of All Time
  3. 3. The Accidental by Ali Smith

    The novel centers around a woman named Amber who unexpectedly arrives and disrupts the lives of the Smart family while they are on summer holiday in Norfolk. Each family member - Eve, a writer, Michael, a university professor, and their children Astrid and Magnus - experience unique interactions with Amber, causing them to question their own realities. The mysterious woman's influence forces the family to confront their secrets, insecurities, and the false narratives they've created about themselves.

    The 8919th Greatest Book of All Time
  4. 4. The Lieutenant Of Inishmore by Martin McDonagh

    The play is a darkly comedic tale set on the Irish island of Inishmore, where we meet Padraic, a violent Irish National Liberation Army enforcer who is more concerned with the welfare of his cat, Wee Thomas, than the human casualties of his day job. When he receives news that his beloved cat is doing poorly, he rushes home, only to find the pet has been killed. This sets off a chain of bloody events as Padraic seeks revenge, leading to an absurdly gruesome climax. The narrative satirizes the political tensions of Ireland and the cyclical nature of violence, all while exploring themes of loyalty, brutality, and the absurdity of extremism.

    The 10623rd Greatest Book of All Time
  5. 5. Lake Of Urine by Guillermo Stitch

    This novel is a darkly comedic and surreal exploration of the lives of two sisters, Nagomi and Bernardette, who navigate a bizarre and oppressive world dominated by eccentric characters and absurd societal norms. Set in a fantastical landscape that defies conventional logic, the story delves into themes of freedom, power, and the quest for individuality. Through a series of strange and often grotesque events, the sisters embark on a journey that challenges their understanding of love, family, and the very fabric of reality. The narrative's unique blend of humor, satire, and grotesque imagery invites readers to reflect on the absurdities of the human condition.

    The 10842nd Greatest Book of All Time
  6. 6. The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney

    "The Glorious Heresies" is a darkly comedic novel set in post-recession Ireland, chronicling the interconnected lives of a cast of colorful characters. When a accidental murder takes place, the lives of a gangster, a prostitute, a teenage drug dealer, and a mother struggling to survive become entangled in a web of secrets and lies. As their paths converge, they are forced to confront the consequences of their actions and grapple with the complexities of love, redemption, and forgiveness in a gritty and unforgiving world.

    The 10865th Greatest Book of All Time

Reading Statistics

Click the button below to see how many of these books you've read!

Download

If you're interested in downloading this list as a CSV file for use in a spreadsheet application, you can easily do so by clicking the button below. Please note that to ensure a manageable file size and faster download, the CSV will include details for only the first 500 books.

Download