Madness And Civilization by Michel Foucault

The book is a profound and critical exploration of the history of the treatment of the mentally ill in Western society, tracing the shifting boundaries between madness and sanity from the Middle Ages to the end of the 18th century. The author argues that the way people with mental illness were treated was a reflection of the cultural, social, and intellectual mores of the time. He examines the evolution of institutions such as asylums and the role of medical and philosophical discourse in defining and managing madness, suggesting that the treatment of the mentally ill has often been a way of exerting social control rather than a genuine effort to help those suffering. The work challenges readers to reconsider the relationship between reason, unreason, and the structures of power and knowledge.

The 3280th greatest book of all time


Published
1961
Nationality
French
Type
Nonfiction
Pages
Unknown
Words
70,000
Original Language
French

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