Biblioteca

This is one of the 200 lists we use to generate our main The Greatest Books list.

  • Fictions by Jorge Luis Borges

    "Collected Fiction" is a compilation of stories by a renowned author that takes readers on a journey through a world of philosophical paradoxes, intellectual humor, and fantastical realities. The book features a range of narratives, from complex, multi-layered tales of labyrinths and detective investigations, to metaphysical explorations of infinity and the nature of identity. It offers an immersive and thought-provoking reading experience, blurring the boundaries between reality and fiction, past and present, and the self and the universe.

  • Moby Dick by Herman Melville

    The novel is a detailed narrative of a vengeful sea captain's obsessive quest to hunt down a giant white sperm whale that bit off his leg. The captain's relentless pursuit, despite the warnings and concerns of his crew, leads them on a dangerous journey across the seas. The story is a complex exploration of good and evil, obsession, and the nature of reality, filled with rich descriptions of whaling and the sea.

  • Franz Kafka: The Complete Stories by Franz Kafka

    This collection of stories offers a comprehensive look at the work of a renowned author, known for his surreal and often unsettling depictions of modern life. The stories explore themes of existential anxiety, guilt, and absurdity, often through narratives in which ordinary people face extraordinary, inexplicable circumstances. The collection showcases the author's unique style and his profound influence on 20th-century literature.

  • Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes

    This classic novel follows the adventures of a man who, driven mad by reading too many chivalric romances, decides to become a knight-errant and roam the world righting wrongs under the name Don Quixote. Accompanied by his loyal squire, Sancho Panza, he battles windmills he believes to be giants and champions the virtuous lady Dulcinea, who is in reality a simple peasant girl. The book is a richly layered critique of the popular literature of Cervantes' time and a profound exploration of reality and illusion, madness and sanity.

  • Ulysses by James Joyce

    Set in Dublin, the novel follows a day in the life of Leopold Bloom, an advertising salesman, as he navigates the city. The narrative, heavily influenced by Homer's Odyssey, explores themes of identity, heroism, and the complexities of everyday life. It is renowned for its stream-of-consciousness style and complex structure, making it a challenging but rewarding read.

  • Doctor Faustus by Thomas Mann

    The novel is a reimagining of the Faust legend set in the context of the first half of the 20th century and the turmoil of Germany in that period. It tells the story of a composer who makes a pact with the devil, exchanging his soul for unlimited creative genius. The protagonist's life and work reflect the cultural and political journey of Germany leading up to World War II, providing a deep exploration of the individual's role in a society undergoing dramatic change. The novel is also a profound meditation on the nature of time, the art and the artist, and the destructiveness of human ambition.

  • Los Siete Locos by Roberto Arlt

    "Los Siete Locos" is a complex and dark novel set in the 1920s in Buenos Aires. The story revolves around a man who, disillusioned with his mundane life and the corruption he sees around him, becomes involved with a group of anarchists who plan to overthrow the government. The protagonist is drawn into a world of madness, conspiracy, and philosophical debate, as he grapples with his own sanity and the morality of his actions. The book explores themes of existentialism, societal decay, and the blurred line between sanity and insanity.

  • Poems of Eugenio Montale by Eugenio Montale

    The book is a collection of poems by an acclaimed Italian poet. It explores themes of love, nature, time, and mortality, characterized by a unique blend of vivid imagery and philosophical insight. Through his words, the poet offers a deeply personal and introspective look at the human condition, all the while maintaining an intense connection with the natural world. His profound and evocative language has made him one of the most respected figures in 20th-century Italian literature.

  • The Bible by Christian Church

    This religious text is a compilation of 66 books divided into the Old and New Testaments, forming the central narrative for Christianity. It encompasses a variety of genres, including historical accounts, poetry, prophecy, and teaching, telling the story of God's relationship with humanity, from creation to the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and the early Christian church. It is considered by believers to be divinely inspired and serves as a guide for faith and practice.

  • The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe

    This collection brings together all of the author's most famous works, including poems, short stories, and novellas. Known for his macabre and gothic storytelling, the author's works are filled with themes of death, love lost, and human frailty. Notable inclusions are the haunting poem "The Raven," the chilling stories "The Tell-Tale Heart" and "The Fall of the House of Usher," and his only complete novel, "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym."

  • Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

    This novel follows the story of a young girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole into a fantastical world full of peculiar creatures and bizarre experiences. As she navigates through this strange land, she encounters a series of nonsensical events, including a tea party with a Mad Hatter, a pool of tears, and a trial over stolen tarts. The book is renowned for its playful use of language, logic, and its exploration of the boundaries of reality.

  • If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem by William Faulkner

    The novel is a collection of four related stories, each focusing on a different protagonist. The stories are set in the Southern United States and explore themes of love, loss, and the struggle to survive in harsh circumstances. The characters are often isolated and alienated, struggling with their own personal demons and the harsh realities of their environment. The narrative style is complex and challenging, with frequent shifts in time and perspective, reflecting the fragmented and chaotic nature of the characters' lives.

  • First Folio by William Shakespeare

    This collection is a compilation of 36 plays by a renowned English playwright, published seven years after his death. It includes comedies, histories, and tragedies, some of which had never been published before. Notable works in the compilation include "Macbeth," "Julius Caesar," "Twelfth Night," "The Tempest," and "As You Like It." The collection is considered one of the most influential books ever published in the English language, as it preserved many of the playwright's works that might have otherwise been lost.

  • Betrayed by Rita Hayworth by Manuel Puig

    The novel explores the life of a young boy growing up in a small town in Argentina during the 1930s and 1940s. It is a coming-of-age story that uses a unique narrative structure, incorporating a mix of dialogues, inner thoughts, and film scripts to depict the protagonist's life. The boy's obsession with Hollywood films and glamorous actresses, particularly Rita Hayworth, serves as an escape from his oppressive environment and shapes his understanding of the world. The book also delves into themes of sexuality, identity, and the impact of popular culture.

  • The Trial by Franz Kafka

    The book revolves around a bank clerk who wakes one morning to find himself under arrest for an unspecified crime. Despite not being detained, he is subjected to the psychological torment of a bizarre and nightmarish judicial process. The story is a critique of bureaucracy, exploring themes of guilt, alienation and the inefficiency of the justice system.

  • Facundo by Domingo Faustino Sarmiento

    "Facundo" is a socio-political critique and historical account of Argentina during the first half of the 19th century. The book examines the life of the gaucho, Facundo Quiroga, who becomes a powerful and ruthless warlord, illustrating the destructive effects of caudillismo (military dictatorship) on society. The author uses Quiroga's life to delve into broader themes such as the struggle between civilization and barbarism, the need for education, and the dangers of unchecked political power.

  • In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust

    This renowned novel is a sweeping exploration of memory, love, art, and the passage of time, told through the narrator's recollections of his childhood and experiences into adulthood in the late 19th and early 20th century aristocratic France. The narrative is notable for its lengthy and intricate involuntary memory episodes, the most famous being the "madeleine episode". It explores the themes of time, space and memory, but also raises questions about the nature of art and literature, and the complex relationships between love, sexuality, and possession.

  • The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot

    "The Waste Land" is a long poem that presents a bleak and despairing view of the world following the devastation of World War I. The poem is divided into five parts and uses a wide range of literary and cultural references, as well as multiple narrators, to depict a world in ruins. It explores themes of disillusionment, despair, and the decline of civilization, and is often considered a seminal work of modernist literature.

  • The Castle by Franz Kafka

    This novel presents the story of a man who arrives in a village and struggles to gain access to the mysterious authorities who govern it from a castle. The protagonist, a surveyor, faces the constant frustration of his efforts to make contact with the elusive authorities and integrate into village society. The book explores themes of alienation, bureaucracy, the seemingly endless frustrations of man's attempts to stand against the system, and the futile pursuit of an unobtainable goal.

  • One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    This novel is a multi-generational saga that focuses on the Buendía family, who founded the fictional town of Macondo. It explores themes of love, loss, family, and the cyclical nature of history. The story is filled with magical realism, blending the supernatural with the ordinary, as it chronicles the family's experiences, including civil war, marriages, births, and deaths. The book is renowned for its narrative style and its exploration of solitude, fate, and the inevitability of repetition in history.

  • Essays by Michel de Montaigne

    This collection of essays explores a wide range of topics such as solitude, cannibals, the power of the imagination, the education of children, and the nature of friendship. The author employs a unique and personal approach to philosophy, using anecdotes and personal reflections to illustrate his points. The essays provide a profound insight into human nature and condition, and are considered a significant contribution to both literature and philosophy.

  • Nine Stories by J. D. Salinger

    "Nine Stories" is a collection of short stories that delve into the complex inner lives of a variety of characters, often exploring themes of innocence, alienation, and the loss of innocence. Each story is unique, offering a glimpse into a different world or situation, but all are marked by the author's distinctive narrative voice and his ability to create compelling, deeply human characters. From a young boy dealing with the death of his brother to a World War II veteran struggling with PTSD, the stories are both profound and deeply affecting.

  • Poems of Pablo Neruda by Pablo Neruda

    This book is a collection of poetry by a renowned Chilean poet who is known for his passionate, intense, and deeply emotional verses. The poems touch on a variety of themes, including love, nature, politics, and the human condition. The poet's unique style, which combines vivid imagery, profound emotion, and a deep connection with the natural world, is evident in each of the pieces in this collection.

  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    This classic novel explores the complex, passionate, and troubled relationship between four brothers and their father in 19th century Russia. The narrative delves into the themes of faith, doubt, morality, and redemption, as each brother grapples with personal dilemmas and family conflicts. The story culminates in a dramatic trial following a murder, which serves as a microcosm of the moral and philosophical struggles faced by each character, and by extension, humanity itself.

  • War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

    Set in the backdrop of the Napoleonic era, the novel presents a panorama of Russian society and its descent into the chaos of war. It follows the interconnected lives of five aristocratic families, their struggles, romances, and personal journeys through the tumultuous period of history. The narrative explores themes of love, war, and the meaning of life, as it weaves together historical events with the personal stories of its characters.

  • The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri

    In this epic poem, the protagonist embarks on an extraordinary journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso). Guided by the ancient Roman poet Virgil and his beloved Beatrice, he encounters various historical and mythological figures in each realm, witnessing the eternal consequences of earthly sins and virtues. The journey serves as an allegory for the soul's progression towards God, offering profound insights into the nature of good and evil, free will, and divine justice.

  • The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

    An aging Cuban fisherman struggles with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream, isolated from the world and from human help. For days, he fights the marlin alone, admiring its strength, dignity, and faithfulness to its identity—its destiny is as true as his as a fisherman. He finally kills the marlin, but sharks attack and devour it before he can return to the shore. The fisherman returns home empty-handed but remains undefeated, having proven his abilities to himself.

  • Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

    This classic novel follows the journey of a seaman who travels up the Congo River into the African interior to meet a mysterious ivory trader. Throughout his journey, he encounters the harsh realities of imperialism, the brutal treatment of native Africans, and the depths of human cruelty and madness. The protagonist's journey into the 'heart of darkness' serves as both a physical exploration of the African continent and a metaphorical exploration into the depths of human nature.

  • The Red and the Black by Stendhal

    The novel is a detailed psychological portrait of Julien Sorel, a young man from a provincial background who aspires to rise above his humble beginnings. He uses his intelligence and hypocrisy to advance in the post-Napoleonic French society, which is deeply divided by class and political loyalties. The story is a critique of the society's materialism and hypocrisy as Julien's ambitions lead him to a tragic end. The title refers to the contrasting uniforms of the army and the church, the two routes available to him for upward mobility.

  • Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats by W. B. Yeats

    This book is a comprehensive collection of poems by a renowned Irish poet. The collection spans his entire career, showcasing his evolution as a poet, from romantic and aesthetic works to more complex, mature pieces reflecting his interest in spirituality and Irish mythology. The book includes his most famous works, as well as lesser-known pieces, providing a thorough overview of his contribution to 20th century literature.

  • One Thousand and One Nights by Unknown

    This is a collection of Middle Eastern folk tales compiled during the Islamic Golden Age. The stories are told by a young woman, who must weave a new tale each night for her husband, a king, to delay her execution. The tales are filled with magic, adventure, love, and betrayal, and include well-known stories such as "Aladdin's Wonderful Lamp", "Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves", and "The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor".

  • The Last Books of Hector Viel Temperley by Hector Viel Temperley


    "The Last Books of Hector Viel Temperley" is a compilation of the Argentine author's final three books of poetry, displaying his unique style that combines spiritual and erotic themes. The author's deeply personal and emotional poems are often centered around religious mysticism and sensual love, with a particular focus on the body and physicality. The collection also includes a series of sonnets dedicated to the Virgin Mary, reflecting the author's strong Catholic faith.

  • The Odes by Horace

    "The Odes" is a collection of lyric poems by an ancient Roman poet. The poems cover a wide range of themes, including love, friendship, wine, nature, morality, and the human condition. The author's style is noted for its elegance, wit, and mastery of meter. The poems also reflect the social and political context of Rome during the author's lifetime, providing insight into the culture and values of the period.

  • Los lanzallamas by Roberto Arlt

    "Los lanzallamas" is a novel set in Buenos Aires in the 1920s, revolving around the lives of a group of characters who are marginalized by society. The protagonist, a failed inventor turned anarchist, is manipulated into participating in a plot to overthrow the government and establish a new social order. The plot fails, leading to tragic consequences for the characters involved. The novel explores themes of alienation, disillusionment, and the struggle for individual freedom in a repressive society.

  • The Leopard by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa

    "The Leopard" is a historical novel set in 19th-century Sicily, during the time of the Italian unification or Risorgimento. It centers on an aging, aristocratic protagonist who is coming to terms with the decline of his class and the rise of a new social order. The narrative weaves together personal drama with the larger political and social upheaval of the time, providing a rich, nuanced portrait of a society in transition. Despite his resistance to change, the protagonist ultimately recognizes its inevitability and the futility of his efforts to preserve the old ways.

  • Ferdydurke by Witold Gombrowicz

    "Ferdydurke" is a satirical novel that explores the themes of maturity, identity, and societal norms. The protagonist, a thirty-year-old writer, is forcibly regressed by two professors back to his adolescence and placed in a school setting. The narrative critiques the artificiality of adulthood and the pressure of societal expectations, while also exploring the struggle for self-expression and individuality. The book is known for its absurdist humor and its examination of the human condition.

  • Stories of Guy de Maupassant by Guy de Maupassant

    This book is a collection of short stories from a renowned French author, known for his masterful storytelling and keen observations of human nature. The narratives delve into various aspects of life, from love and loss to morality and deception, showcasing the author's ability to capture the complexity of human emotions and experiences. His stories often carry a cynical tone, reflecting the harsh realities of life, and are noted for their surprise endings.

  • The Burning Plain and Other Stories by Juan Rulfo

    "The Burning Plain and Other Stories" is a collection of short narratives set in the harsh rural areas of Mexico, depicting the brutal realities of peasant life. The stories are filled with characters who are haunted by their past, living in extreme poverty, and often meeting violent ends. The book is renowned for its stark, realistic portrayal of life and its exploration of the human capacity for hope and survival in the face of despair.

  • Confessions of Zeno by Italo Svevo

    "Confessions of Zeno" is a satirical, semi-autobiographical novel that follows the life of Zeno Cosini, a neurotic Italian businessman, as he tries to quit smoking. The book is presented as a diary, written at the suggestion of Zeno's psychoanalyst, and it details Zeno's thoughts on his health, his family, his business ventures, and his infatuation with a beautiful woman. Throughout the story, Zeno's attempts to quit smoking serve as a metaphor for his struggles with his personal weaknesses and his quest for self-understanding.

  • Poems of Federico García Lorca by Federico García Lorca

    This collection is an anthology of poems by a renowned Spanish poet, which are characterized by their passionate lyricism, vivid imagery, and exploration of love, death, and the Andalusian landscape. The poet's works often incorporate elements of surrealism and are deeply influenced by traditional Spanish music and folklore. The anthology provides a comprehensive overview of his poetic output, showcasing his unique ability to convey complex emotions and experiences through his evocative verse.

  • Jakob Von Gunten by Robert Walser

    This novel is a first-person account of a young man who leaves his privileged life to enroll at a school for servants in Berlin. The protagonist's observations and experiences in the school, his interactions with the headmaster and other students, and his internal struggles and reflections form the crux of the story. The narrative, imbued with irony and dark humor, explores themes of power, submission, individuality, and the absurdity of societal norms and expectations.

About this list

Argentina, 41 Books

38 Argentinean Authors were polled by the Argentinean government for their favorite books. This is a tally of all books with more than 1 vote.

Added over 9 years ago.

How Good is this List?

This list has a weight of 87%. To learn more about what this means please visit the Rankings page.

Here is a list of what is decreasing the importance of this list:

  • voters are mostly from 1 location or country

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