The Greatest Irish, Spanish "Fiction" Books Since 2000

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This list represents a comprehensive and trusted collection of the greatest books. Developed through a specialized algorithm, it brings together 268 'best of' book lists to form a definitive guide to the world's most acclaimed books. For those interested in how these books are chosen, additional details can be found on the rankings page.

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  1. 1. The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

    The novel follows the story of a young boy in post-war Barcelona, who discovers a mysterious book in a hidden library that his father takes him to, which houses forgotten books. The boy becomes captivated by the book and its author, but as he grows older, he realizes that someone is destroying all books written by this author. As he delves deeper into the mystery, the boy's life becomes intertwined with the author's, revealing a dark and tragic past that someone wants to be kept hidden. The story is a mix of romance, mystery, and a historical narrative set against the turbulent backdrop of a city recovering from war.

  2. 2. The Master by Colm Tóibín

    "The Master" is a fictionalized biography of the renowned author Henry James, chronicling his life from 1895 to 1899. The narrative delves into James' personal life, his relationships, and his struggles with his craft. The book reveals his inner thoughts and feelings, his unfulfilled desires, and his deep-seated fears. It also explores his relationships with his family, friends, and some of the most prominent figures of his time. The narrative is a deep, introspective exploration of a complex, introverted character, and the world in which he lived.

  3. 3. Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer

    A 12-year-old genius and criminal mastermind, Artemis Fowl, kidnaps a fairy, Captain Holly Short, for a large ransom of gold with the help of his bodyguard, Butler, to restore his family's fortune. In the process, he discovers an underground world of armed and dangerous fairies. The fairies fight back with magic, cunning, and technological weapons leading to a high-stakes battle of wits.

  4. 4. A Heart So White by Javier Marías

    The novel delves into the complexities of relationships, secrets, and communication as the protagonist, a translator and interpreter, grapples with the mysterious suicide of his father's first wife and the pervasive silence surrounding it. Through his own marriage and his observations of others', he contemplates the unsaid and the power of words, both spoken and unspoken. The narrative weaves through time and memory, exploring the impact of the past on the present and the intricate ways in which people understand and misunderstand each other.

  5. 5. Your Face Tomorrow: Fever and Spear by Javier Marías

    The novel explores the life of a Spanish expatriate in England who is recruited by a secretive organization due to his unique ability to interpret people's behavior. As he becomes entangled in a world of espionage, he grapples with moral and ethical dilemmas, questioning the validity of his work and the consequences of his actions. Through a blend of introspective musings and suspenseful narrative, the protagonist's life unravels, revealing a complex web of deceit, betrayal, and violence.

  6. 6. William Trevor: The Collected Stories by William Trevor

    This collection brings together numerous short stories from a renowned author, demonstrating his masterful storytelling ability. The stories span a variety of themes and settings, often focusing on the complexities of human relationships and the subtle nuances of everyday life. The author's keen eye for detail and ability to capture the human condition in his works have earned him a place among the greatest short story writers.

  7. 7. Room by Emma Donoghue

    "Room" by Emma Donoghue is a novel about a young woman named Ma who has been held captive in a small room for seven years with her five-year-old son Jack. The story is told from Jack's point of view as he struggles to understand the world outside of Room and adjust to life after their escape. The novel explores themes of resilience, trauma, and the power of love and imagination.

  8. 8. Bartleby & Co by Enrique Vila-Matas

    "Bartleby & Co" is a metafictional work that explores the theme of "writers of the No," authors who cease to write or never start at all. The narrator, an office worker on sick leave, uses footnotes to a nonexistent text to delve into the stories of these authors, including famous real-life figures. The book serves as a meditation on silence, refusal, and the nature of literature itself.

  9. 9. The Sea by John Banville

    "The Sea" is a profound exploration of memory, grief, and loss. The novel follows the story of a widower who returns to a seaside town where he spent his childhood summers. His present-day experiences are interwoven with memories of a transformative event from his youth involving a wealthy family he befriended. As he grapples with the loss of his wife to cancer, he also deals with the haunting memories of the past. The narrative is a deep dive into the human psyche, exploring themes of love, loss, and the fluidity of time.

  10. 10. The Gathering by Anne Enright

    "The Gathering" is a powerful and evocative family saga set in Ireland, exploring the complex dynamics of a large Irish family following the suicide of one of the siblings. The story is narrated by Veronica, the sister of the deceased, who delves into her family's past, uncovering a traumatic event that has shaped their lives. The narrative is a mix of present events, childhood memories, and imagined scenarios, all of which contribute to a profound exploration of memory, truth, and the bonds of family.

  11. 11. Brooklyn by Colm Tóibín

    The novel tells the story of a young Irish woman, Eilis Lacey, in the 1950s who, unable to find work at home, is sent to Brooklyn by a helpful priest where she builds a new life. She finds work, studies to become a bookkeeper, and falls in love with an Italian plumber named Tony. However, a family tragedy forces her to return to Ireland, where she must choose between her new life in America and her old life at home.

  12. 12. Netherland by Joseph O'Neill

    "Netherland" is a post-9/11 novel set in New York City, which explores the life of a Dutch banker named Hans. After his wife and son move back to London, Hans becomes immersed in the world of cricket, where he befriends a charismatic Trinidadian named Chuck Ramkissoon who dreams of building a cricket stadium in the city. The novel is a meditation on the American Dream, identity, and the immigrant experience, all set against the backdrop of a city and a country grappling with a new reality.

  13. 13. The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas by John Boyne

    This novel follows the story of a young boy who moves from Berlin to a house near a concentration camp during World War II. Unaware of the grim reality of his surroundings, he befriends another boy on the other side of the camp fence. The two develop a deep friendship despite the horrific circumstances, leading to a devastating and unforgettable ending.

  14. 14. Soldiers of Salamis by Javier Cercas

    This novel revolves around a true event during the Spanish Civil War, where a nationalist soldier spares the life of a famous poet who was about to be executed. The story is told from the perspective of a journalist who becomes obsessed with the incident and embarks on a quest to uncover the truth about what happened. As he delves deeper, he discovers the complexities of heroism, history, and memory, and is forced to question his own understanding of these concepts.

  15. 15. La Dama Número Trece by José Carlos Somoza

    This novel is a thrilling blend of mystery, horror, and fantasy, revolving around a struggling writer who becomes the target of a secret society known as "The Thirteen Ladies". These shadowy figures have the ability to manipulate reality through the power of words and storytelling. As he is drawn deeper into their world, he must uncover their secrets and find a way to survive their deadly games. The narrative is a rich exploration of the power of language and mythology, with a suspenseful plot that keeps readers on the edge of their seats.

  16. 16. City of Bohane by Kevin Barry

    Set in the year 2053, the book is a dystopian tale about the city of Bohane, a place filled with vice, violence, and tribal warfare. The city is controlled by a gangster named Logan Hartnett, who is challenged by his estranged wife Macu and her lover, a rival gang leader. The narrative is filled with colorful characters, rich language, and a unique blend of futuristic and archaic elements, creating a vivid, darkly comic vision of a future Ireland.

  17. 17. Days Without End by Sebastian Barry

    "Days Without End" is a historical fiction novel that follows the life of an Irish immigrant who enlists in the U.S. Army in the 1850s. The protagonist's experiences include fighting in the Indian Wars and the Civil War, as well as falling in love with a fellow soldier. The novel explores themes of identity, love, and survival in a brutal and unforgiving era of American history.

  18. 18. A Long Long Way by Sebastian Barry

    This novel vividly captures the harrowing experiences of a young Irish soldier caught in the brutal trenches of World War I. As he navigates the horrors of war, he also grapples with the complex political tensions of his homeland, torn between loyalty to the British forces and the rising call for Irish independence. Through his journey, the protagonist confronts the brutal realities of conflict, the bonds of camaraderie, and the personal quest for identity amidst the chaos of war and the shifting landscapes of early 20th-century Ireland. The narrative combines historical detail with profound emotional depth, exploring themes of loyalty, identity, and the devastating impact of war on the human spirit.

  19. 19. Faithful Place by Tana French

    "Faithful Place" is a gripping psychological thriller that follows the story of Frank Mackey, a detective in the Dublin Undercover squad. When a suitcase belonging to his long-lost girlfriend from twenty years ago is discovered in an abandoned house, Frank is forced to confront his painful past and the secrets that tore him apart from his family and the love of his life. As he delves deeper into the mystery, Frank becomes entangled in a web of lies, betrayal, and murder, ultimately leading him to question his own identity and the choices he has made.

  20. 20. That They May Face the Rising Sun by John McGahern

    This book tells the story of a couple who have moved from London to rural Ireland to live a quiet and peaceful life. Their days are filled with simple pleasures and the beauty of the natural world. However, their tranquility is occasionally disrupted by the complex relationships and struggles of their neighbors. The novel offers a deeply moving exploration of love, loss, and the relentless passage of time.

  21. 21. P.S. I Love You by Cecelia Ahern

    The book revolves around a young widow whose life is shattered when her husband dies from a brain tumor. As she struggles with grief and the prospect of moving on, she discovers a series of letters her husband left behind, each ending with "P.S. I Love You." These letters, designed to help her cope with her loss and gradually guide her through her pain, lead her on a journey of rediscovery. Through the tasks and reflections prompted by the letters, she navigates the complexities of love, friendship, and healing, ultimately finding a path toward a new beginning.

  22. 22. Sepharad by Antonio Muñoz Molina

    "Sepharad" is a compelling tapestry of narratives that weaves together stories of displacement, loss, and memory across different times and geographies. The novel explores the experiences of various characters, some historical and others fictional, who face the consequences of exile and persecution. Through their interconnected tales, the book delves into the themes of identity, the enduring impact of the Spanish Inquisition, the Holocaust, and the broader human condition of searching for belonging. The title references the Hebrew word for Spain, invoking the Sephardic Jewish diaspora and the broader sense of longing for a homeland that resonates throughout the novel.

  23. 23. A Girl Is A Half Formed Thing by Eimear McBride

    "A Girl Is A Half Formed Thing" is a powerful and experimental novel that delves into the psyche of a young woman as she navigates through a tumultuous and abusive childhood, her complex relationship with her mentally and physically disabled brother, and her own journey towards self-discovery and identity. Written in a unique stream-of-consciousness style, the book explores themes of trauma, sexuality, religion, and resilience, offering a raw and unflinching portrayal of the human experience.

  24. 24. In The Woods by Tana French

    In this psychological mystery, a detective on the Dublin Murder Squad is pulled into a case that unsettlingly intersects with his own past. As a child, he was the sole survivor of a mysterious incident that left two of his friends missing in the woods. Now, with the murder of a young girl in the same woods, he must confront his traumatic memories while trying to solve the case. The investigation becomes increasingly complex, blurring the lines between the detective's professional duties and his deeply personal quest for answers, leading to a chilling exploration of memory, identity, and the darkness that can lurk beneath the surface of seemingly idyllic settings.

  25. 25. Solar Bones by Mike McCormack

    The novel is a stream-of-consciousness narrative that unfolds from the perspective of a deceased middle-aged engineer as he reminisces about his life on All Souls' Day in County Mayo, Ireland. Through a single unbroken sentence, the protagonist reflects on his past experiences, including his family life, work, the complexities of modernity, and the political issues of contemporary Ireland. The narrative weaves together the personal and the political, exploring themes of time, memory, and the interconnectedness of individual lives with the broader societal and environmental forces at play.

Reading Statistics

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If you're interested in downloading this list as a CSV file for use in a spreadsheet application, you can easily do so by clicking the button below. Please note that to ensure a manageable file size and faster download, the CSV will include details for only the first 500 books.

Download