The Greatest Norwegian, Russian "Fiction" Books Since 1980

Click to learn how this list is calculated.

This list represents a comprehensive and trusted collection of the greatest books. Developed through a specialized algorithm, it brings together 280 'best of' book lists to form a definitive guide to the world's most acclaimed books. For those interested in how these books are chosen, additional details can be found on the rankings page.

Filter by: Genres Dates Countries
Follow on:

Genres

Fiction

Add additional genre filters

Countries

Norwegian

Russian

Add additional country filters

Date Range

Filter

Reading Statistics

Click the button below to see how many of these books you've read!

Download

If you're interested in downloading this list as a CSV file for use in a spreadsheet application, you can easily do so by clicking the button below. Please note that to ensure a manageable file size and faster download, the CSV will include details for only the first 500 books.

Download
  1. 1. Life and Fate by Vasily Grossman

    "Life and Fate" is a sweeping epic that explores the human condition during the Siege of Stalingrad in World War II. The novel delves into the lives of a wide range of characters, from soldiers and scientists to children and victims of the Holocaust, providing a stark and unflinching portrayal of the horrors of war, the brutality of totalitarianism, and the resilience of the human spirit. At the same time, it also examines themes of love, loss, and the struggle for freedom and dignity in the face of overwhelming adversity.

  2. 2. Sophie's World: A Novel About the History of Philosophy by Jostein Gaarder

    "Sophie's World" is a unique and intriguing novel that intertwines the narrative of a young girl named Sophie with a comprehensive history of Western philosophy. Sophie begins receiving mysterious letters from an unknown philosopher and gradually becomes engrossed in the world of philosophy. The book uses Sophie's journey to explore philosophical concepts and theories, from ancient to modern times, in an accessible and engaging way, making it an excellent introduction to the subject for readers of all ages.

  3. 3. House with the Blind Glass Windows by Herbjørg Wassmo

    "House with the Blind Glass Windows" is a poignant tale of a young girl growing up in Norway during the 1950s. The narrative explores her struggles with family secrets, abuse, and the oppressive nature of her small, rural community. The protagonist's journey towards understanding and overcoming her traumatic past forms the crux of the story, which is set against the backdrop of post-war Europe.

  4. 4. Summer in Baden-Baden by Leonid Tsypkin

    "Summer in Baden-Baden" is a unique blend of fact and fiction that intertwines the author's own travels to Leningrad with a reimagining of Fyodor Dostoevsky's summer in Baden-Baden, Germany. The narrative shifts between the two journeys, exploring themes of obsession, identity, and the power of literature. The author's fascination with Dostoevsky serves as a lens through which he examines his own life and experiences as a Jew in Soviet Russia, while also providing a fresh perspective on the famous Russian author's life and works.

  5. 5. The Clay Machine-gun by Victor Pelevin

    "The Clay Machine-gun" is a surreal and complex novel that explores the nature of reality and illusion. The story is set in post-Soviet Russia and follows a protagonist who has multiple identities, including a poet in 19th-century Russia, a 20th-century psychiatric patient, and a 21st-century advertising executive. The narrative moves between these identities and realities, blurring the lines between them and creating a layered and philosophical exploration of Russian society, identity, and the human psyche.

  6. 6. Happy Moscow by Andrey Platonov

    "Happy Moscow" is a satirical novel set in the Soviet Union during the height of Stalinist rule, following the life of a young woman, Moscow Chestnova, who is named after the capital city. Despite the harsh realities of life under an authoritarian regime, she maintains a positive and optimistic outlook, symbolizing the Soviet Union's propaganda that promoted an image of a happy and prosperous society. The novel, through its characters and their experiences, explores the paradoxes and contradictions of the Soviet society, challenging the official narrative of happiness and prosperity.

  7. 7. Out Stealing Horses by Per Petterson

    The novel is a poignant exploration of a man's relationship with his father and his own identity. Set in Norway, it follows the protagonist's decision to live in solitude after the death of his wife and sister. Through a series of flashbacks, he recalls his childhood, particularly the summer of 1948 when he lived with his father in the country. As he delves into his past, he uncovers his father's involvement in the resistance during World War II and the lasting impact it had on their relationship and his own life. The narrative intertwines the past and the present, reflecting on themes of loss, betrayal, and the complexity of human relationships.

  8. 8. Soul and Other Stories by Andrey Platonov

    "Soul and Other Stories" is a collection of short stories that delve into the human condition and the struggle for identity in a world filled with political and social upheaval. The stories are set in a variety of contexts, from the harsh landscapes of Central Asia to the chaos of the Russian Revolution. The characters are often faced with existential crises, grappling with questions of purpose, meaning, and morality. The narrative is marked by a unique blend of philosophical inquiry, poetic prose, and a deep sense of empathy for the human plight.

  9. 9. The Life of Insects by Victor Pelevin

    "The Life of Insects" is a surreal novel that explores the complexities of post-Soviet Russia through the lens of a bizarre seaside community of humans who transform into various types of insects. The narrative unfolds through a series of interconnected stories that delve into the characters' struggles, dreams, and fears, serving as a metaphor for the human condition. The book provides a satirical commentary on society's ills, touching on themes of capitalism, corruption, and the search for identity in a rapidly changing world.

  10. 10. Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith

    In a 1950s Soviet Union gripped by fear and paranoia, Leo Demidov, a dedicated officer of the state security agency, is faced with a chilling reality: a series of brutal child murders that the government refuses to acknowledge. As Leo defies his superiors and embarks on a dangerous investigation, he becomes entangled in a web of political intrigue and personal danger, risking everything to uncover the truth and protect those he loves. "Child 44" is a gripping thriller that explores the dark underbelly of a repressive regime and the resilience of one man determined to bring justice to a society plagued by secrets.

  11. 11. The Zone by Sergei Dovlatov

    "The Zone" is a semi-autobiographical novel that follows the life of a writer who is confined to a Soviet labor camp. Through a series of vignettes, the protagonist reflects on his experiences in the camp, the absurdities of the Soviet system, and the struggles of maintaining his identity and integrity in the face of oppression. With dark humor and sharp observations, the book offers a poignant and satirical portrayal of life in the Soviet Union.

  12. 12. Pushkin Hills by Sergei Dovlatov

    The book is a tragicomic novel that follows the story of an unsuccessful writer and divorced father who takes a summer job as a tour guide at the rural estate of a famous Russian poet. As he immerses himself in the petty concerns and daily life of the museum staff and local villagers, the protagonist grapples with his own literary ambitions, the complexities of his personal life, and the cultural legacy of the poet whose memory he is charged with preserving. The narrative is infused with sharp wit and a deep sense of irony as it explores themes of artistic integrity, cultural heritage, and the absurdities of Soviet life.

  13. 13. On The Golden Porch by Tatyana Tolstaya

    "On The Golden Porch" is a collection of short stories that delve into the lives of various characters in Soviet Russia, exploring themes of memory, history, and the complexities of human experience. The narrative weaves through the mundane and the extraordinary, painting vivid portraits of individuals as they navigate the peculiarities of their existence. With a blend of magical realism and sharp social observation, the stories capture the essence of Russian culture and psyche during a time of great change, revealing the resilience and richness of the human spirit in the face of the absurdities of life.

  14. 14. Selected Short Stories Of Cora Sandel by Cora Sandel

    The collection of short stories by the Norwegian author offers a rich tapestry of human experience, capturing the subtle nuances of everyday life with a keen eye for detail and a deep understanding of the human condition. Set against the backdrop of early 20th-century Scandinavia, the stories delve into themes of love, loss, identity, and the struggle for self-expression. The author's lyrical prose and empathetic character portrayals invite readers into intimate worlds where ordinary moments reveal profound truths, and the quiet struggles of her characters resonate with universal significance.

  15. 15. Medea And Her Children by Lyudmila Ulitskaya

    "Medea And Her Children" by Lyudmila Ulitskaya is a powerful and emotionally charged novel that delves into the complex relationships between a mother and her children. Set in Soviet Russia, the story follows the lives of three generations of women as they navigate the challenges of love, sacrifice, and the oppressive political climate. Through vivid and compelling storytelling, Ulitskaya explores the universal themes of family, loyalty, and the enduring strength of a mother's love.

  16. 16. The Time: Night by Ludmila Petrushevskaya

    The book is a stark portrayal of the struggles faced by a multi-generational family living in the cramped quarters of a Moscow apartment during the twilight years of the Soviet Union. The narrative is driven by the matriarch, a poet who is both resilient and weary, as she navigates the complexities of caring for her mentally unstable daughter and her neglected grandson. The story delves deep into themes of maternal sacrifice, poverty, and the relentless passage of time, painting a grim picture of domestic life and the burdens of womanhood in a society that is as unforgiving as it is oppressive.

  17. 17. Hurramabad by Andrei Volos

    "Hurramabad" is a gripping and thought-provoking novel set in contemporary Russia. The story follows the lives of three young men who find themselves entangled in a web of corruption, violence, and political intrigue in the city of Hurramabad. As they navigate through the complexities of power and loyalty, the characters are forced to confront their own moral dilemmas and make difficult choices that will shape their futures. With its vivid portrayal of a corrupt society and its exploration of themes such as friendship, love, and the pursuit of justice, "Hurramabad" offers a compelling and immersive reading experience.

  18. 18. The Redbreast by Jo Nesbø

    "The Redbreast" is a gripping thriller that follows the life of Detective Harry Hole as he investigates a series of mysterious murders that seem to be connected to events from World War II. As he delves deeper into the case, Hole uncovers a web of conspiracy, betrayal, and political intrigue that spans decades and threatens to shake the foundations of his own life. With its complex characters, intricate plot, and atmospheric setting, "The Redbreast" keeps readers on the edge of their seats until the final page.

  19. 19. The Half Brother: A Novel by Lars Saabye Christensen

    "The Half Brother" is a compelling narrative that follows the life of a young man named Barnum Nilsen. Born into a Norwegian family with a mysterious past, Barnum navigates through life with a half-brother, Fred, who is both his best friend and his rival. As Barnum grows older, he becomes a successful writer, but his personal life is marked by loss, loneliness, and the weight of his family's secrets. The book is a profound exploration of identity, love, and the bonds of family.

  20. 20. A Dream In Polar Fog by Yuri Rytkheu

    "A Dream In Polar Fog" is a captivating and poignant tale that follows the journey of John MacLennan, a Scottish whaler who becomes stranded in the Arctic. As he navigates the harsh and unforgiving landscape, MacLennan encounters the indigenous Chukchi people and forms a deep bond with a young Chukchi boy named Khariton. Through their shared experiences and cultural exchange, the novel explores themes of identity, survival, and the power of human connection amidst the backdrop of the Arctic wilderness.

  21. 21. The Good Life Elsewhere by Vladimir Lorchenkov

    "The Good Life Elsewhere" is a darkly humorous and satirical novel that follows a group of Moldovan villagers who embark on a chaotic journey to Italy in search of a better life. Through their misadventures, the author exposes the harsh realities of poverty, corruption, and the desperate measures people are willing to take in pursuit of a brighter future. With a blend of absurdity and poignant social commentary, the novel offers a compelling exploration of the human condition and the universal desire for a better life.

  22. 22. There Once Lived A Woman Who Tried To Kill Her Neighbour’s Baby by Ludmila Petrushevskaya

    In this collection of dark and haunting tales set in Soviet Russia, Ludmila Petrushevskaya explores the depths of human desperation and the complexities of human relationships. Through her vivid and evocative storytelling, she delves into the lives of ordinary individuals who are trapped in a web of loneliness, despair, and unfulfilled desires. With a blend of realism and the supernatural, Petrushevskaya crafts a mesmerizing narrative that exposes the raw emotions and hidden secrets that lie within the human heart.

  23. 23. Klotsvog by Margarita Khemlin

    "Klotsvog" is a poignant and introspective novel that follows the life of Maya Abramovna Klotsvog, a Jewish woman living in Soviet Russia during the 20th century. Through Maya's perspective, the book explores themes of identity, love, and the struggles faced by Jews in a society plagued by anti-Semitism. With a blend of humor and tragedy, the story delves into Maya's personal relationships, her experiences as a mother and wife, and her resilience in the face of adversity. Ultimately, "Klotsvog" is a profound exploration of one woman's journey through life and her unwavering spirit in the midst of societal challenges.

  24. 24. The Sacred Book Of The Werewolf by Victor Pelevin

    This novel introduces readers to a captivating world where ancient myth meets modern life through the eyes of a two-thousand-year-old werefox named A Hu-Li. Disguised as a teenage girl, she navigates contemporary Russia, using her supernatural abilities and seductive powers to survive in a society dominated by men. Her life takes a dramatic turn when she falls in love with a werewolf, a figure representing the novel's exploration of themes such as identity, transformation, and the search for spiritual enlightenment. Set against the backdrop of post-Soviet Russia, the narrative delves into philosophical discussions, blending Eastern philosophies with the complexities of modern existence, all while maintaining a sharp sense of humor and a deep sense of mysticism.

  25. 25. Absurdistan by Gary Shteyngart

    "Absurdistan" is a satirical novel by Gary Shteyngart that follows the story of Misha Vainberg, a wealthy and overweight Russian-American who finds himself stuck in the fictional country of Absurdistan after his father's death. The country is on the brink of a civil war, and Misha must navigate his way through the corrupt and absurd political landscape to get back to America and reunite with his love interest. Along the way, he encounters a cast of eccentric characters and experiences the absurdity of life in a country where everything seems to be falling apart.

Reading Statistics

Click the button below to see how many of these books you've read!

Download

If you're interested in downloading this list as a CSV file for use in a spreadsheet application, you can easily do so by clicking the button below. Please note that to ensure a manageable file size and faster download, the CSV will include details for only the first 500 books.

Download