The Greatest "Nobility" Books of All Time

Click to learn how this list is calculated.

This list represents a comprehensive and trusted collection of the greatest books. Developed through a specialized algorithm, it brings together 268 'best of' book lists to form a definitive guide to the world's most acclaimed books. For those interested in how these books are chosen, additional details can be found on the rankings page.

Filter by: Genres Dates Countries

Genres

Nobility

The category of "Nobility" in books encompasses stories that revolve around the lives of aristocrats, royals, and other members of high society. These books often explore the themes of power, wealth, and privilege, as well as the struggles and challenges faced by those who hold such positions. The characters in these books are often complex and multi-dimensional, with their personal lives and relationships playing a significant role in the plot. Overall, the category of "Nobility" offers readers a glimpse into the glamorous and often tumultuous world of the upper class.

Add additional genre filters

Countries

Date Range

Filter

Reading Statistics

Click the button below to see how many of these books you've read!

Download

If you're interested in downloading this list as a CSV file for use in a spreadsheet application, you can easily do so by clicking the button below. Please note that to ensure a manageable file size and faster download, the CSV will include details for only the first 500 books.

Download
  1. 1. Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov

    The novel is a unique blend of fiction, commentary, and poetry, presented as a 999-line poem written by a fictional poet, followed by an extensive commentary and foreword by his neighbor and academic colleague. The novel blurs the line between reality and fiction, as the commentator's notes reveal an alternative narrative, one of exile, intrigue, and murder. The book is a playful exploration of authorship, deception, and the nature of art.

  2. 2. Hamlet by William Shakespeare

    This classic play revolves around the young Prince of Denmark who is thrown into a state of emotional turmoil after his father's sudden death and his mother's quick remarriage to his uncle. The prince is visited by the ghost of his father who reveals that he was murdered by the uncle, prompting the prince to seek revenge. The narrative explores themes of madness, revenge, and moral corruption as the prince navigates the complex political and emotional landscape of the Danish court.

  3. 3. The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

    Set in the 1870s, the novel revolves around Newland Archer, a young lawyer from New York's high society, who is engaged to the beautiful and conventional May Welland. His life takes a turn when he meets May's cousin, the Countess Ellen Olenska, who has returned from Europe after leaving her scandalous husband. Torn between his duty and passion, Archer struggles with the constraints of the society he is a part of. The book offers a vivid portrayal of the struggle between individual desires and societal expectations in the upper-class New York society of the late 19th century.

  4. 4. First Folio by William Shakespeare

    This collection is a compilation of 36 plays by a renowned English playwright, published seven years after his death. It includes comedies, histories, and tragedies, some of which had never been published before. Notable works in the compilation include "Macbeth," "Julius Caesar," "Twelfth Night," "The Tempest," and "As You Like It." The collection is considered one of the most influential books ever published in the English language, as it preserved many of the playwright's works that might have otherwise been lost.

  5. 5. The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe

    This collection brings together all of the author's most famous works, including poems, short stories, and novellas. Known for his macabre and gothic storytelling, the author's works are filled with themes of death, love lost, and human frailty. Notable inclusions are the haunting poem "The Raven," the chilling stories "The Tell-Tale Heart" and "The Fall of the House of Usher," and his only complete novel, "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym."

  6. 6. Orlando: A Biography by Virginia Woolf

    The novel follows the life of a young nobleman in Elizabethan England who inexplicably transforms into a woman at the age of 30 and lives on for three centuries without aging. Throughout the centuries, the protagonist experiences various historical events, engages in relationships with both men and women, and explores the complexities of gender identity and sexuality. The book is an exploration of the fluidity of gender and time, as well as a critique of societal norms and expectations.

  7. 7. The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

    A captivating tale of mystery and suspense, "The Woman in White" follows the story of a young art teacher, Walter Hartright, who encounters a mysterious woman dressed in white on a moonlit road. The woman is revealed to be a mental asylum escapee, and as Hartright delves into her story, he uncovers a web of deceit, madness, and dangerous secrets involving a wealthy, titled family. The narrative explores themes of identity, insanity, and the abuse of power, with a complex plot filled with twists and turns.

  8. 8. Lady Chatterley's Lover by D. H. Lawrence

    "Lady Chatterley's Lover" is a controversial novel that explores themes of class, sexuality, and the human condition. The story revolves around a young, upper-class woman married to a paralyzed war veteran who, feeling emotionally and physically neglected, embarks on a passionate affair with the estate's gamekeeper. The narrative delves into the protagonist's sexual awakening and her struggle against societal norms, ultimately advocating for emotional honesty and physical intimacy as essential components of a fulfilling life.

  9. 9. Macbeth by William Shakespeare

    This classic play follows the tragic tale of Macbeth, a Scottish general whose ambition is sparked by a prophecy from three witches that he will one day become King of Scotland. Consumed by ambition and spurred on by his wife, Macbeth murders King Duncan and takes the throne. However, guilt and paranoia plague him, leading to a reign of terror and further bloodshed. His desperate attempts to cling onto power lead to his downfall, illustrating the destructive power of unchecked ambition.

  10. 10. King Lear by William Shakespeare

    This classic tragedy revolves around the aging King Lear, who decides to divide his kingdom among his three daughters based on their declarations of love for him. The two elder daughters, Goneril and Regan, flatter him with insincere praises, while the youngest, Cordelia, refuses to play the game and is disowned. As the king's sanity deteriorates, his kingdom falls into chaos under the rule of his deceitful elder daughters. The play explores themes of power, loyalty, madness, and justice, culminating in a tragic ending where almost all the main characters, including King Lear and Cordelia, die.

  11. 11. The Once and Future King by T. H. White

    This novel is a retelling of the Arthurian legend, from Arthur's childhood tutelage under the wizard Merlyn to his eventual death. The story follows Arthur's journey from a naive boy to a wise and just king, his establishment of the Round Table, his marriage to Guinevere, and his complex relationship with his illegitimate son, Mordred. The narrative explores themes of power, justice, war, and human nature, offering a nuanced and humanizing portrayal of a well-known mythical figure.

  12. 12. The Tempest by William Shakespeare

    "The Tempest" is a classic play about a sorcerer and rightful Duke of Milan who has been stranded on an island for 12 years with his daughter after being betrayed by his brother. Using his magical powers and the help of an airy spirit, he conjures a storm to shipwreck his brother and other enemies on the island. The narrative explores themes of revenge, power, magic, and forgiveness as the sorcerer manipulates events on the island to regain his dukedom and secure a good future for his daughter.

  13. 13. The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey

    A detective, laid up in the hospital, becomes fascinated with a portrait of Richard III, the historical figure accused of murdering his nephews to secure his throne. He decides to apply his investigative skills to delve into the mystery, using historical documents and records as his clues. As he pieces together the puzzle, he begins to question the accepted narrative of Richard as a villain, suggesting that this image was a fabrication by the Tudors to legitimize their own claim to the throne.

  14. 14. Le Morte d'Arthur by Thomas Malory

    This classic work is a compilation of stories and legends about the legendary King Arthur, his knights, and the Round Table. It tells of Arthur's rise to power, his quest for the Holy Grail, and his tragic downfall. The book, written in the 15th century, is considered one of the most influential pieces of Arthurian literature and has significantly shaped the modern perception of Arthur, Merlin, Guinevere, Lancelot, and other iconic characters.

  15. 15. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

    A young boy named Max, dressed in his wolf costume, wreaks such havoc through his household that he is sent to bed without his supper. In his room, a mysterious, wild forest and sea grows out of his imagination, and Max sails to the land of the Wild Things. The Wild Things are fearsome-looking monsters, but Max conquers them by “staring into their yellow eyes without blinking once”, and he is made the king of all wild things. However, he soon finds himself lonely and homesick and returns home to his bedroom where he finds his supper waiting for him, still hot.

  16. 16. Gormenghast by Mervyn Peake

    Set in a vast, crumbling castle named Gormenghast, the story follows the life of Titus Groan, the heir to the Earl of Groan. The narrative explores the complex, rigidly structured society within the castle and the struggles and intrigues of its eccentric characters, particularly the scheming kitchen boy Steerpike. As Titus grows older, he begins to rebel against the stifling traditions of Gormenghast, setting the stage for a dramatic clash between the old and the new.

  17. 17. A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin

    This epic fantasy novel is set in the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros, where 'summers span decades and winters can last a lifetime'. The story follows three main plot lines: the Stark family's struggle to control the North; the exiled Targaryen siblings' attempt to regain the throne; and the Night's Watch's fight against the supernatural beings beyond the Wall. As these stories intertwine, a game of power, politics, and survival unfolds, where you either win or you die.

  18. 18. The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley

    This novel reimagines the Arthurian legends from the perspectives of the women involved. It centers around Morgaine, Arthur's half-sister, who is a priestess of Avalon, and Gwenhwyfar, Arthur's queen. The story explores their roles in the political and spiritual conflicts that arise as Christianity begins to replace the old pagan ways. It delves into themes of love, loyalty, and power, while offering a fresh take on a classic tale.

  19. 19. Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain

    This book is a semi-autobiographical account of the author's experiences as a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi River before the American Civil War. It provides a detailed and humorous depiction of life and society along the river, including the author's own journey from an eager young apprentice to a seasoned riverboat pilot. The book also includes a travelogue of a journey down the Mississippi River much later in life, offering a look at the dramatic changes brought about by industrialization and the Civil War.

  20. 20. Richard III by William Shakespeare

    "Richard III" is a historical play that follows the Machiavellian rise to power and subsequent short reign of its titular character. Richard, Duke of Gloucester, is depicted as a ruthless, power-hungry man who will stop at nothing to take the throne of England, resorting to manipulation, deceit, and even murder. However, his reign is plagued by guilt and insecurity, and his tyranny eventually leads to his downfall and death in battle. The play explores themes of power, corruption, morality, and the consequences of unchecked ambition.

  21. 21. The Golden Bough by James George Frazer

    "The Golden Bough" is a comprehensive study on mythology and religion, exploring the common themes found in different cultures around the world. The author uses a wide range of sources to argue that human belief progressed through three stages: primitive magic, replaced by religion, which in turn was replaced by science. The book delves into various rituals and customs, including the concept of the dying god in mythology and the role of fertility rites in agriculture. The author's theories have had a profound influence on both literature and anthropology.

  22. 22. Heat and Dust by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala

    "Heat and Dust" is a novel set in two different time periods in India, exploring themes of colonialism, gender roles, and cultural clash. The story alternates between the 1920s, following the scandalous life of Olivia, an English colonial wife who falls in love with an Indian prince, and the 1970s, where her step-granddaughter journeys to India to uncover the truth about Olivia's life and her own identity. The narrative exposes the complexities of love, culture, and identity in the context of British colonial rule and post-colonial India.

  23. 23. Nightmare Abbey by Thomas Love Peacock

    "Nightmare Abbey" is a satirical novel that explores the world of the romantic movement in British literature. The story revolves around a melancholic young man who lives in a gloomy mansion, which serves as a gathering place for many of his eccentric friends. The protagonist's romantic woes and his friends' philosophical debates, which often mock the prevailing intellectual trends of the day, form the crux of the narrative. The novel humorously critiques the romantic ideals of love and heroism while also providing a social commentary on the intellectual pretensions of the era.

  24. 24. Titus Alone by Mervyn Peake

    "Titus Alone" is the third book in a series where the protagonist, Titus Groan, leaves his ancestral home, Gormenghast, to explore the world beyond. He stumbles upon a technologically advanced city, a stark contrast to his gothic homeland, and faces a series of adventures and challenges. The book delves into themes of identity, belonging, and the clash of tradition versus modernity, as Titus grapples with his past and uncertain future.

  25. 25. A Distant Mirror by Barbara Tuchman

    "A Distant Mirror" is a historical narrative that vividly depicts the calamitous 14th century, a time marked by the Black Death, religious strife, and the Hundred Years War. The book follows the life of a French nobleman, offering a detailed account of his experiences and the broader social, political, and cultural transformations of the era. The author draws parallels between the 14th century and the 20th century, highlighting recurrent patterns in history such as warfare, pandemics, and societal unrest.

Reading Statistics

Click the button below to see how many of these books you've read!

Download

If you're interested in downloading this list as a CSV file for use in a spreadsheet application, you can easily do so by clicking the button below. Please note that to ensure a manageable file size and faster download, the CSV will include details for only the first 500 books.

Download