1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die by The Book

A book edited by Peter Boxall, and written by over 100 hundred international critics.

  1. One Thousand and One Nights by India/Iran/Iraq/Egypt

    One Thousand and One Nights is a collection of Middle Eastern and South Asian stories and folk tales compiled in Arabic during the Islamic Golden Age. It is often known in English as the Arabian Ni...

  2. The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter by

    The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter is a 10th-century Japanese monogatari (fictional prose narrative) containing Japanese folklore. It is considered the oldest extant Japanese prose narrative although th...

  3. The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu

    The Tale of Genji is a classic work of Japanese literature attributed to the Japanese noblewoman Murasaki Shikibu in the early eleventh century, around the peak of the Heian Period. It is sometimes...

  4. Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Guanzhong Luo

    The Romance of the Three Kingdoms is Lo Kuan-chung's retelling of the events attending the fall of the Han Dynasty in 220 A.D., one of the most tumultuous and fascinating periods in Chinese history...

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  5. The Water Margin: Outlaws of the Marsh by Shi Naian

    The Water Margin, known in China as Shuihu Zhuan, is one of the "Four Great Classical Novels" of vernacular Chinese literature, despite being banned by Imperial Edict at the end of the Ming Dynasty...

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  6. The Golden Ass (Metamorphoses): Or Metamorphoses by Apuleius

    Apuleius (c. 125-c. 180) was a student of Platonist philosophy and Latin prose writer who produced the novel "Metamorphoses", more popularly known as "The Golden Ass". This work is the only Latin n...

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  7. Tirant Lo Blanc by

    Tirant lo Blanch is a chivalric romance written by the Valencian knight Joanot Martorell, finished posthumously by his friend Martí Joan de Galba and published in the city of Valencia in 1490 as an...

  8. La Celestina by

    The Comedy of Calisto and Melibea (Spanish: Comedia de Calisto y Melibea), known in Spain as La Celestina is a work entirely in dialogue published in 1499. It is attributed to Fernando de Rojas, a ...

  9. Amadis of Gaul by

    Amadís de Gaula (Spanish: Amadís de Gaula, IPA: [amaˈðis ðe ˈɣaula]); is a landmark work among the chivalric romances which were in vogue in sixteenth-century Spain, although its first version, muc...

  10. The Life of Lazarillo de Tormes by

    "The bastard son of a prostitute, Lazarillo goes to work for a blind beggar, who beats and starves him, while teaching him some very useful dirty tricks. The boy then drifts in and out of the servi...

  11. Gargantua and Pantagruel by Francois Rabelais

    The Life of Gargantua and of Pantagruel (in French, La vie de Gargantua et de Pantagruel) is a connected series of five novels written in the 16th century by François Rabelais. It is the story of t...

  12. The Lusiad by Luís Vaz Camões

    Os Lusíadas (Portuguese pronunciation: [uʒ luˈzi.ɐðɐʃ]), usually translated as The Lusiads, is a Portuguese epic poem by Luís Vaz de Camões (sometimes anglicized as Camoens). Written in Homeric fas...

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  13. Journey to the West by Wu Cheng'en

    Journey to the West is a Chinese novel published in the 16th century during the Ming Dynasty and attributed to Wu Cheng'en. It is one of the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature. In En...

  14. The Unfortunate Traveller by Thomas Nashe

    The Unfortunate Traveller: or, the Life of Jack Wilton (published The Unfortunate Traueller: or, The Life of Jacke Wilton) is a picaresque novel by Thomas Nashe first published in 1594 but set duri...

  15. Thomas of Reading, Or, The Sixe Worthie Yeomen of the West by Thomas Deloney

    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

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  16. Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes

    Alonso Quixano, a retired country gentleman in his fifties, lives in an unnamed section of La Mancha with his niece and a housekeeper. He has become obsessed with books of chivalry, and believes th...

  17. The Travels of Persiles and Sigismunda by Miguel de Cervantes

    The Travails of Persiles and Sigismunda is a romance or Byzantine novel by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, his last work and one that stands in opposition to the more famous novel Don Quixote by its ...

  18. The True History of the Conquest of New Spain by Bernal Díaz del Castillo

    Historia verdadera de la conquista de la Nueva España (The True History of the Conquest of New Spain) is the first-person narrative written in 1576 by Bernal Díaz del Castillo (1492–1581), the mili...

  19. Simplicius Simplicissimus by Hans Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen

    Simplicius Simplicissimus (German: Der abenteuerliche Simplicissimus Teutsch) is a picaresque novel of the lower Baroque style, written in 1668 by Hans Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen and prob...

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  20. The Princess of Cleves by Madame de La Fayette

    La Princesse de Clèves is a French novel, regarded by many as the beginning of the modern tradition of the psychological novel, and as a great classic work. Its author is generally held to be Madam...

  21. Oroonoko by Aphra Behn

    Aphra Behn, the poet, playwright, novelist and political satirist was the first truly professional woman writer in English. This selection, edited and introduced by Professor Janet Todd, demonstrat...

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  22. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

    A shipwreck’s sole escapee, Robinson Crusoe endures 28 years of solitude on a Caribbean island and manages not only to survive but also to prevail. A warm humanity, evocative details of his struggl...

  23. Love in Excess; or, The Fatal Enquiry by Eliza Haywood

    Love in Excess (1719–1720) is Eliza Haywood's best known novel. It details the amorous escapades of Count D'Elmont, a rake who becomes reformed over the course of the novel. Love in Excess was a hu...

  24. Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe

    The Fortunes & Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders Who was Born in Newgate, and during a Life of continu'd Variety for Threescore Years, besides her Childhood, was Twelve Year a Whore, five tim...

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  25. Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift

    From the preeminent prose satirist in the English language, a great classic recounting the four remarkable journeys of ship's surgeon Lemuel Gulliver. For children it remains an enchanting fantasy;...

  26. A Modest Proposal and Other Satirical Works by Jonathan Swift

    Treasury of five shorter works by the author of Gulliver's Travels offers ample evidence of the great satirist's inspired lampoonery. Title piece plus The Battle of the Books, A Meditation Upon a B...

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  27. Joseph Andrews by Henry Fielding

    Joseph Andrews, or The History of the Adventures of Joseph Andrews and of his Friend Mr. Abraham Adams, was the first published full-length novel of the English author Henry Fielding, and indeed am...

  28. Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus by Scriblerus Club

    The Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus is an incomplete satirical work co-written ostensibly by the members of the Scriblerus Club during the years 1713–14, including Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope and...

  29. Pamela by Samuel Richardson

    Richardson's novel is among the first English novels to explore the inner depths of human psychology. Told in a series of letters, his classic tale of a virginal serving maid pursued by her employe...

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  30. Clarissa by Samuel Richardson

    It tells the tragic story of a heroine whose quest for virtue is continually thwarted by her family, and is one of the longest novels in the English language.

  31. Tom Jones by Henry Fielding

    A foundling of mysterious parentage brought up by Mr. Allworthy on his country estate, Tom Jones is deeply in love with the seemingly unattainable Sophia Western, the beautiful daughter of the neig...

  32. Fanny Hill by John Cleland

    Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure—popularly known as Fanny Hill (an anglicisation of the Latin mons veneris, mound of Venus)—is an erotic novel by English novelist John Cleland first published in Lond...

  33. The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle by Tobias Smollett

    The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle is a picaresque novel by the Scottish author Tobias Smollett (1721–1771), first published in 1751 and revised and published again in 1758. It tells the story of a...

  34. The Female Quixote by Charlotte Lennox

    The Female Quixote; or, The Adventures of Arabella is a novel written by Charlotte Lennox imitating and parodying the ideas of Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote. Published in 1752, two years after s...

  35. Candide by Voltaire

    Candide, ou l'Optimisme is a French satire written in 1759 by Voltaire, a philosopher of the Age of Enlightenment. Candide is characterized by its sarcastic tone and its erratic, fantastical, an...

  36. The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia by Samuel Johnson, Abraham Raimbach, Robert Smirke

    The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia, originally titled The Prince of Abissinia: A Tale, though often abbreviated to Rasselas, is an apologue about happiness by Samuel Johnson. The book's o...

  37. Julie, or the New Heloise by Jean-Jacques Rousseau

    Julie, or the New Heloise (French: Julie, ou la nouvelle Héloïse), original entitled Lettres de Deux Amans, Habitans d'une petite Ville au pied des Alpes ("Letters from two lovers, living in a smal...

  38. Emile, or On Education by Jean-Jacques Rousseau

    Emile, or On Education (French: Émile, ou De l’éducation) is a treatise on the nature of education and on the nature of man written by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who considered it to be the "best and m...

  39. The Castle of Otranto: A Gothic Story by Horace Walpole

    The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. It is generally regarded as the first gothic novel, initiating a literary genre which would become extremely popular in the later 18th centu...

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  40. The Vicar of Wakefield by Oliver Goldsmith

    The Vicar of Wakefield – subtitled A Tale, Supposed to be written by Himself – is a novel by Irish writer Oliver Goldsmith (1728–1774). It was written from 1761 to 1762 and published in 1766. It wa...

  41. Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne

    As its title suggests, the book is ostensibly Tristram's narration of his life story. But it is one of the central jokes of the novel that he cannot explain anything simply, that he must make expla...

  42. A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy by Laurence Sterne

    A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy is a novel by Laurence Sterne, written and first published in 1768, as Sterne was facing death. In 1765, Sterne travelled through France and Italy as ...

  43. The Man of Feeling by Henry Mackenzie

    The Man of Feeling is a sentimental novel published in 1771, written by Scottish author Henry Mackenzie. The novel presents a series of moral vignettes which the naïve protagonist Harley either obs...

  44. The Expedition of Humphry Clinker by Tobias Smollett

    The Expedition of Humphry Clinker was the last of the picaresque novels of Tobias Smollett, published in London on 17 June 1771 (just three months before Smollett's death), and is considered by man...

  45. The Sorrows of Young Werther by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    The Sorrows of Young Werther is an epistolary and loosely autobiographical novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, first published in 1774; a revised edition of the novel was published in 1787. Werthe...

  46. Evelina by Fanny Burney

    Evelina, or the History of a Young Lady's Entrance into the World is a novel written by English author Fanny Burney and first published in 1778. Although published anonymously, its authorship was ...

  47. Reveries of a Solitary Walker by Jean-Jacques Rousseau

    Reveries of a Solitary Walker (French: Les Rêveries du promeneur solitaire) is an unfinished book by Genevan philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau, written between 1776 and 1778. It was the last of a n...

  48. Dangerous Liaison by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos

    The complex moral ambiguities of seduction and revenge make Les Liaisons dangereuses (1782) one of the most scandalous and controversial novels in European literature. Its prime movers, the Vicomte...

  49. The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau by Jean-Jacques Rousseau

    Confessions is an autobiographical book by Jean-Jacques Rousseau. In modern times, it is often published with the title The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau in order to distinguish it from St. ...

  50. The 120 Days of Sodom by Marquis de Sade

    The 120 Days of Sodom, or the School of Libertinage (Les 120 Journées de Sodome ou l'école du libertinage) is a novel by the French writer and nobleman Donatien Alphonse François, Marquis de Sade. ...

  51. Anton Reiser by Karl Philipp Moritz

    Anton Reiser is a psychological novel by Karl Philipp Moritz , of which the first three parts appeared in Berlin from 1785 to 1786. The fourth and last part appeared in 1790.

  52. Vathek by William Beckford

    Vathek (alternatively titled Vathek, an Arabian Tale or The History of the Caliph Vathek) is a Gothic novel written by William Beckford. It was composed in French beginning in 1782, and then transl...

  53. Justine by Marquis de Sade

    Justine, or The Misfortunes of Virtue (French: Justine, ou Les Malheurs de la Vertu) is a 1791 novel by Donatien Alphonse François de Sade, better known as the Marquis de Sade. Justine is set just ...

  54. Dream of the Red Chamber by Cao Xueqin

    Dream of the Red Chamber is a masterpiece of Chinese vernacular literature and one of China's Four Great Classical Novels. The novel was composed some time in the middle of the 18th century during ...

  55. The Adventures of Caleb Williams by William Godwin

    Things as They Are; or The Adventures of Caleb Williams (often abbreviated to Caleb Williams) (1794) by William Godwin is a three-volume novel written as a call to end the abuse of power by what Go...

  56. The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano by Olaudah Equiano

    The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African, first published in 1789 in London,[1] is the autobiography of Olaudah Equiano. The narrative is argued to b...

  57. The Mysteries of Udolpho by Ann Radcliffe

    The Mysteries of Udolpho, by Ann Radcliffe, was published in four volumes on 8 May 1794 by G. G. and J. Robinson of London. The firm paid her £500 for the manuscript. The contract is housed at the ...

  58. Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship (German: Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre) is the second novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, published in 1795–96. - Wikipedia

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  59. The Monk by Matthew Lewis

    The Monk: A Romance is a Gothic novel by Matthew Gregory Lewis, published in 1796. A quickly written book from early in Lewis's career (in one letter he claimed to have written it in ten weeks, but...

  60. Camilla by Fanny Burney

    Camilla, subtitled A Picture of Youth, is a novel by Frances Burney, first published in 1796. Camilla deals with the matrimonial concerns of a group of young people: Camilla Tyrold and her sisters,...

  61. Jacques the Fatalist and His Master by Denis Diderot

    The main subject of the book is the relationship between the valet Jacques and his master (who is never named). The two are traveling to a destination the narrator leaves insistently vague, and to ...

  62. The Nun by Denis Diderot

    La Religieuse (The Nun or Memoirs of a Nun) is an 18th-century French novel by Denis Diderot. Completed in about 1780, the work was not published until 1796, after Diderot's death.

  63. Hyperion by Friedrich Holderlin

    Hyperion is a novel of stirring lyricism, philosophical sublimity, and enduring influence. It stands among Hölderlin’s most extraordinary achievements. A Greek hermit recounts the pivotal phases of...

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  64. Castle Rackrent by Maria Edgeworth

    Castle Rackrent is a short novel by Maria Edgeworth published in 1800, one of the few of Edgeworth's novels which her father did not “edit”.Shortly before its publication, an introduction, glossary...

  65. Heinrich of Ofterdingen by Novalis

    Heinrich von Ofterdingen is a fabled, quasi-fictional Middle High German lyric poet and Minnesinger mentioned in the 13th century epic of the Sängerkrieg (minstrel contest) on the Wartburg. The leg...

  66. Rameau's Nephew by Denis Diderot

    Rameau's Nephew, or the Second Satire (French: Le Neveu de Rameau ou La Satire seconde) is an imaginary philosophical conversation written by Denis Diderot, probably between 1761 and 1772.

  67. Elective Affinities by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    Elective Affinities (German: Die Wahlverwandtschaften), also translated under the title Kindred by Choice, is the third novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, published in 1809. The title is taken fr...

  68. Michael Kohlhaas by Heinrich von Kleist

    "You can send me to the scaffold, but I can make you suffer, and I mean to." Based on actual historic events, this thrilling saga of violence and retribution bridged the gap between medieval and mo...

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  69. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

    Sense and Sensibility is a novel by Jane Austen, published in 1811. It was published anonymously; By A Lady appears on the cover page where the author's name might have been. It tells the story of ...

  70. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

    The book is narrated in free indirect speech following the main character Elizabeth Bennet as she deals with matters of upbringing, marriage, moral rightness and education in her aristocratic socie...

  71. Mansfield Park by Jane Austen

    Mansfield Park is the third published novel by Jane Austen, first published in 1814 by Thomas Egerton. A second edition was published in 1816 by John Murray, still within Austen's lifetime. The nov...

  72. Emma by Jane Austen

    Before she began the novel, Austen wrote, "I am going to take a heroine whom no-one but myself will much like."[1] In the very first sentence she introduces the title character as "Emma Woodhouse, ...

  73. Rob Roy by Walter Scott

    Rob Roy (1817) is a historical novel by Walter Scott. It is considered one of the Waverley novels, as the author identified himself on the title page as "by the author of Waverley". Frank Osbaldis...

  74. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

    At this challenge, Mary Shelley began work on the 'ghost story' that was to evolve into the most celebrated horror novel in literary history. Frankenstein was published the next year and become the...

  75. Ivanhoe by Walter Scott

    Ivanhoe is a historical novel by Sir Walter Scott published in 1820 and set in 12th-century England. Ivanhoe is sometimes credited for increasing interest in romance and medievalism; John Henry New...

  76. Melmoth the Wanderer by Charles Robert Maturin

    Melmoth the Wanderer is an 1820 Gothic novel by Irish playwright, novelist and clergyman Charles Maturin. The novel's titular character is a scholar who sold his soul to the devil in exchange for 1...

  77. The Life and Opinions of the Tomcat Murr by E. T. A. Hoffmann

    Tomcat Murr is a loveable, self-taught animal who has written his own autobiography. But a printer's error causes his story to be accidentally mixed and spliced with a book about the composer Johan...

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  78. The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg

    Considered by turns part-gothic novel, part-psychological mystery, part-metafiction, part-satire, part-case study of totalitarian thought, it can also be thought of as an early example of modern cr...

  79. Aus dem Leben eines Taugenichts by Joseph von Eichendorff

    The life of a ne'er-do is a novella by Joseph von Eichendorff . It was 1 822 / 1,823 completed and first published in 1826. The work is the highlight of musical prose and as an example of the late ...

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  80. The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper

    The story is set in the British province of New York during the French and Indian War, and concerns—in part—a Huron massacre (with passive French acquiescence) of between 500 to 1,500 Anglo-America...

  81. The Betrothed by Alessandro Manzoni

    The Betrothed is an Italian historical novel by Alessandro Manzoni, first published in 1827, in three volumes. It has been called the most famous and widely read novel of the Italian language. S...

  82. The Red and the Black by Stendhal

    Le Rouge et le Noir (The Red and the Black), subtitled Chronique du XIXe siécle ("Chronicle of the 19th century"), is an historical psychological novel in two volumes by Stendhal, published in 1830...

  83. The Hunchback of Notre-Dame by Victor Hugo

    Quasimodo, a gentle and kind hunchback who lives a lonely, isolated life in a cathedral in Paris, rescues the beautiful Esmerelda from being hanged for a crime she did not commit.

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  84. Eugene Onegin by Alexander Pushkin

    Eugene Onegin, a "novel in verse," as announced by its subtitle, and Russia's best-loved classic, was written by Alexander Pushkin, that country's unsurpassed literary idol. Yet the American readin...

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  85. Eugenie Grandet by Honoré de Balzac

    1927. Balzac is considered to be the greatest name in the post-Revolutionary literature of France. His writings display a profound knowledge of the human heart, with an extraordinary range of knowl...

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  86. Father Goriot by Honoré de Balzac

    Le Père Goriot (English: Father Goriot or Old Goriot) is an 1835 novel by French novelist and playwright Honoré de Balzac (1799–1850), included in the Scènes de la vie privée section of his novel s...

  87. The Nose by Nikolai Gogol

    "The Nose" (Russian: Нос Nos) is a satirical short story by Nikolai Gogol written during his time living in St. Petersburg. During this time, Gogol's works were primarily focused on surrealism and ...

  88. The Adventures of Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

    At the heart of Charles Dickens's second novel, first published in 1838, is a story as much about crime and poverty as it is about justice and charity. Orphaned at birth, Oliver Twist grows up unde...

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  89. The Lion of Flanders by Hendrik Conscience

    The Lion of Flanders, or the Battle of the Golden Spurs (Dutch: De Leeuw van Vlaenderen, of de Slag der Gulden Sporen) is a major novel first published in 1838 by the Belgian writer Hendrik Conscie...

  90. The Charterhouse of Parma by Stendhal

    Balzac considered it the most important French novel of his time. André Gide later deemed it the greatest of all French novels, and Henry James judged it to be a masterpiece. Now, in a major litera...

  91. The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe

    "The Fall of the House of Usher" is a narrative short story by American writer Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1839 in Burton's Gentleman's Magazine before being included in the collection Tale...

  92. Camera Obscura by Nicolaas Beets

    Camera Obscura is a collection of stories from 1839 written by Nicolaas Beets under the pseudonym Hildebrand . Beets wrote most of the pieces in 1837 as a student of Theology in Leiden . During the...

  93. A Hero of Our Time by Mikhail Lermontov

    A Hero of Our Time is a novel by Mikhail Lermontov published in 1840. It tells the story of a young officer, Pechorin, sent to the Caucasus after a duel. This is what the author himself wrote about...

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  94. Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol

    Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol, Russian writer, was first published in 1842, and is one of the most prominent works of 19th-century Russian literature. Gogol himself saw it as an "epic poem in prose",...

  95. Lost Illusions by Honoré de Balzac

    Illusions perdues was written by the French writer Honoré de Balzac between 1837 and 1843. It consists of three parts, starting in the provinces, thereafter moving to Paris, and finally returning t...

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  96. The Pit and the Pendulum by Edgar Allan Poe

    "The Pit and the Pendulum" is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe and first published in 1842 in the literary annual The Gift: A Christmas and New Year's Present for 1843. The story is about ...

  97. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas

    The Three Musketeers is a novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. It recounts the adventures of a young man named d'Artagnan after he leaves home to become a guard of the musketeers. D'Artagnan is not one ...

  98. Facundo by Domingo Faustino Sarmiento

    "Sarmiento's Facundo remains a foundational work for the traditions of Latin American fiction and historiography, and so an essential book for English language North Americans also, at least for th...

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  99. The Devil's Pool by George Sand

    La Mare au Diable (The Devil's Pool) is an 1846 novel by George Sand.

  100. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

    Set against the tumultuous years of the post-Napoleonic era, The Count of Monet Cristo recounts the swashbuckling adventures of Edmond Dantes, a dashing young sailor falsely accused of treason. The...

  101. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

    Jane Eyre is a first-person narrative of the title character, a small, plain-faced, intelligent and honest English orphan. The novel goes through five distinct stages: Jane's childhood at Gateshead...

  102. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray

    No one is better equipped in the struggle for wealth and worldly success than the alluring and ruthless Becky Sharp, who defies her impoverished background to clamber up the class ladder. Her senti...

  103. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

    The narrative is non-linear, involving several flashbacks, and two primary narrators: Mr. Lockwood and Ellen "Nelly" Dean. The novel opens in 1801, with Mr. Lockwood arriving at Thrushcross Grange,...

  104. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë

    The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is the second and final novel by the English author Anne Brontë. It was first published in 1848 under the pseudonym Acton Bell. Probably the most shocking of the Brontës...

  105. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

    The story of the abandoned waif who learns to survive through challenging encounters with distress and misfortune.

  106. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Hester Prynne is a beautiful young woman. She is also an outcast. In the eyes of her neighbors she has committed an unforgivable sin. Everyone knows that her little daughter, Pearl, is the product ...

  107. Moby Dick by Herman Melville

    First published in 1851, Melville's masterpiece is, in Elizabeth Hardwick's words, "the greatest novel in American literature." The saga of Captain Ahab and his monomaniacal pursuit of the white wh...

  108. The House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne

    The House of the Seven Gables is a Gothic novel written beginning in mid-1850 by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne and published in April 1851 by Ticknor and Fields of Boston. The novel follows a...

  109. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly is an anti-slavery novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Published in 1852, the novel had a profound effect on attitudes toward African America...

  110. Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell

    Cranford is one of the better-known novels of the 19th-century English writer Elizabeth Gaskell. It was first published in 1851 as a serial in the magazine Household Words, which was edited by Char...

  111. Bleak House by Charles Dickens

    Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in twenty monthly instalments between March 1852 and September 1853. It is held to be one of Dickens's finest novels, containing one of ...

  112. Walden by Henry David Thoreau

    Walden (first published as Walden; or, Life in the Woods) is an American book written by noted transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings.

  113. Green Henry by Gottfried Keller

    'Green Henry' is a representation of Gottfried Keller's ideals and philosophy that documents the emergence of an artist and the development of a man. Partly autobiographical, the narrative recounts...

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  114. North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell

    North and South is a social novel published in 1854 by English writer Elizabeth Gaskell. With Wives and Daughters (1865) and Cranford (1853), it is one of her best-known novels and was adapted for ...

  115. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

    For daring to peer into the heart of an adulteress and enumerate its contents with profound dispassion, the author of Madame Bovary was tried for "offenses against morality and religion." What shoc...

  116. Indian Summer by Adalbert Stifter

    Der Nachsommer (English: Indian Summer; subtitled A Tale; 1857) is a novel in three volumes by Adalbert Stifter. A 19th century Bildungsroman that describes the journey of an idealistic, sheltered ...

  117. Adam Bede by George Eliot

    Adam Bede, the first novel written by George Eliot (the pen name of Mary Ann Evans), was published in 1859. It was published pseudonymously, even though Evans was a well-published and highly respec...

  118. Oblomov by Ivan Goncharov

    Oblomov is the best known novel by Russian writer Ivan Goncharov, first published in 1859. Oblomov is also the central character of the novel, often seen as the ultimate incarnation of the superflu...

  119. The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

    Thus young Walter Hartright first meets the mysterious woman in white in what soon became one of the most popular novels of the nineteenth century. Secrets, mistaken identities, surprise revelation...

  120. The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot

    The Mill on the Floss is a novel by George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans), first published in three volumes in 1860 by William Blackwood. The first American edition was published by Thomas Y. Crowell Co., ...

  121. Max Havelaar by Multatuli

    Max Havelaar: Or the Coffee Auctions of the Dutch Trading Company (Dutch: Max Havelaar, of de koffi-veilingen der Nederlandsche Handel-Maatschappy) is an 1860 novel by Multatuli (the pen name of Ed...

  122. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

    Great Expectations is written in the genre of "bildungsroman" or the style of book that follows the story of a man or woman in their quest for maturity, usually starting from childhood and ending i...

  123. Silas Marner by George Eliot

    Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe is the third novel by George Eliot, published in 1861. An outwardly simple tale of a linen weaver, it is notable for its strong realism and its sophisticated tre...

  124. Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev

    Fathers and Sons is an 1862 novel by Ivan Turgenev, his best known work. The fathers and children of the novel refers to the growing divide between the two generations of Russians, and the chara...

  125. Les Misérables by Victor Hugo

    Les Misérables is a novel by French author Victor Hugo and is widely considered one of the greatest novels of the 19th century. It follows the lives and interactions of several French characters ov...

  126. The Water-Babies, A Fairy Tale for a Land Baby by Charles Kingsley

    The Water-Babies, A Fairy Tale for a Land Baby is a children's novel by Charles Kingsley. Written in 1862–63 as a serial for Macmillan's Magazine, it was first published in its entirety in 1863. It...

  127. Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Notes from Underground is a study of a single character, and a revelation of Dostoyevsky's own deepest beliefs. In this work we follow the unnamed narrator of the story, who, disillusioned by the o...

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  128. Uncle Silas by Sheridan Le Fanu

    Uncle Silas, subtitled "A Tale of Bartram-Haugh", is a Victorian Gothic mystery-thriller novel by the Irish writer J. Sheridan Le Fanu. Despite Le Fanu resisting its classification as such, the nov...

  129. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

    In 1862 Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, a shy Oxford mathematician with a stammer, created a story about a little girl tumbling down a rabbit hole. Thus began the immortal adventures of Alice, perhaps th...

  130. Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne

    Journey to the Center of the Earth (French: Voyage au centre de la Terre, also translated under the titles A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and A Journey to the Interior of the Earth) is an 186...

  131. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    It is a murder story, told from a murder;s point of view, that implicates even the most innocent reader in its enormities. It is a cat-and-mouse game between a tormented young killer and a cheerful...

  132. The Last Chronicle of Barset by Anthony Trollope

    The Last Chronicle of Barset concerns an indigent but learned clergyman, the Reverend Josiah Crawley, the curate of Hogglestock, as he stands accused of stealing a cheque. The novel is notable for...

  133. Thérèse Raquin by Emile Zola

    Thérèse Raquin [teʁɛz ʁakɛ̃] is a novel (first published in 1867) and a play (first performed in 1873) by the French writer Émile Zola. The novel was originally published in serial format in the jo...

  134. The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins

    The Moonstone (1868) by Wilkie Collins is a 19th-century British epistolary novel, generally considered the first detective novel in the English language. The story was originally serialised in Cha...

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  135. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

    Written and set in the Alcott family home, Orchard House, in Concord, Massachusetts, it was published in two parts in 1868 and 1869. The novel follows the lives of four sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Am...

  136. The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Idiot is a novel written by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky and first published in 1868. It was first published serially in Russian in Russky Vestnik, St. Petersburg, 1868-1869. The Idiot...

  137. Maldoror (Les Chants de Maldoror) by Comte de Lautréamont

    This macabre but beautiful work, Les Chants de Maldoror, has achieved a considerable reputation as one of the earliest and most extraordinary examples of Surrealist writing.

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  138. Phineas Finn by Anthony Trollope

    Phineas Finn is a novel by Anthony Trollope and the name of its leading character. The novel was first published as a monthly serial from October 1867 to May 1868 in St Paul's Magazine. It is the s...

  139. A Sentimental Education by Gustave Flaubert

    The novel describes the life of a young man (Frederic Moreau) living through the revolution of 1848 and the founding of the Second French Empire, and his love for an older woman (based on the wife ...

  140. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

    Epic in scale, War and Peace delineates in graphic detail events leading up to Napoleon's invasion of Russia, and the impact of the Napoleonic era on Tsarist society, as seen through the eyes of fi...

  141. King Lear of the Steppes by Ivan Turgenev

    A loose and decidely Russian adaptation of William Shakespeare's tragedy King Lear, set in the countryside, the story concerns the disrespectful treatment the protagonist, Kharlov, receives from hi...

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  142. Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

    Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871) is a novel by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson), the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865). Set some six months later...

  143. Middlemarch by George Eliot

    Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life is a novel by George Eliot, the pen name of Mary Anne Evans, later Marian Evans. It is her seventh novel, begun in 1869 and then put aside during the final i...

  144. Torrents of Spring by Ivan Turgenev

    Torrents of Spring, also known as Spring Torrents (Russian: Вешние воды Veshniye vody), is a novel by Ivan Turgenev that was first published in 1872. It is highly autobiographical in nature, and ce...

  145. Erewhon by Samuel Butler

    Erewhon: or, Over the Range () is a novel by Samuel Butler which was first published anonymously in 1872. The title is also the name of a country, supposedly discovered by the protagonist. In the n...

  146. The Possessed by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Possessed is an 1872 novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. Though titled The Possessed in the initial English translation, Dostoevsky scholars and later translations favour the titles The Devils or Demon...

  147. In a Glass Darkly by Sheridan Le Fanu

    In a Glass Darkly is a collection of five short stories by Sheridan Le Fanu, first published in 1872, the year before his death. The second and third are revised versions of previously published st...

  148. Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

    Around the World in Eighty Days (French: Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours) is an adventure novel by the French writer Jules Verne, published in 1873. In the story, Phileas Fogg of London and...

  149. The Enchanted Wanderer by Nikolai Leskov

    The Enchanted Wanderer (Очарованный странник) is a novel by Nikolai Leskov, first published in Russky Mir newspaper in 1873 (issues Nos. 272, 274, 276, 279, 281, 283, 286, 288, 290, 293, 295, 297, ...

  150. Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

    Far from the Madding Crowd (1874) is Thomas Hardy's fourth novel and his first major literary success. It originally appeared anonymously as a monthly serial in Cornhill Magazine, where it gained a...

  151. Pepita Jimenez by Juan Valera y Alcalá-Galiano

    Pepita Jimenez is the first novel of the diplomat , politician and writer Spanish Juan Valera , published in 1874. Following the model of Cervantes , Valera suggests the recovery of a manuscript...

  152. The Crime of Father Amaro by Eça de Queirós

    O Crime do Padre Amaro ("The Crime of Father Amaro"), subtitled 'Scenes of Religious Life', is a novel by the 19th-century Portuguese writer José Maria de Eça de Queiroz. It was first published in ...

  153. Drunkard by Émile Zola

    L'Assommoir [lasɔmwaʁ] (1877) is the seventh novel in Émile Zola's twenty-volume series Les Rougon-Macquart. Usually considered one of Zola's masterpieces, the novel—a study of alcoholism and pover...

  154. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

    Anna Karenina tells of the doomed love affair between the sensuous and rebellious Anna and the dashing officer, Count Vronsky. Tragedy unfolds as Anna rejects her passionless marriage and must endu...

  155. Martín Fierro by José Hernández

    Martín Fierro, also known as El Gaucho Martín Fierro, is a 2,316-line epic poem by the Argentine writer José Hernández. The poem was originally published in two parts, El Gaucho Martín Fierro (1872...

  156. The Red Room by August Strindberg

    The Red Room (Swedish: Röda rummet) is a Swedish novel by August Strindberg that was first published in 1879.[1] A satire of Stockholm society, it has frequently been described as the first modern ...

  157. Ben-Hur by Lew Wallace

    Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ chronicles the journey of Judah Ben-Hur and the life of Jesus, from Ben-Hur's quest for vengeance against the Romans and his search for his imprisoned family to the bi...

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  158. Nana by Émile Zola

    Nana is a novel by the French naturalist author Émile Zola. Completed in 1880, Nana is the ninth installment in the 20-volume Les Rougon-Macquart series.

  159. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

    The story centres on Isabel Archer, an attractive American whom circumstances have brought to Europe. Isabel refuses the offer of marriage to an English peer and to a bulldog-like New Englander, to...

  160. I Malavoglia by Giovanni Verga

    I Malavoglia (Italian pronunciation: [i malaˈvɔʎʎa]) is the best known novel by Giovanni Verga. It was first printed in 1881. An English edition, The House by the Medlar-Tree (1890), translated by ...

  161. The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas by Machado de Assis

    "In his posthumous memoirs, Braz Cubas, a wealthy nineteenth-century Brazilian, examines (from beyond the grave) his rather undistinguished life in 160 short chapters that both cover the basics of ...

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  162. Bouvard et Pécuchet by Gustave Flaubert

    Bouvard et Pécuchet is an unfinished satirical work by Gustave Flaubert, published in 1881 after his death in 1880. Although conceived in 1863 as Les Deux Cloportes ("The Two Woodlice"), and par...

  163. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

    Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, it is an adventure tale known for its superb atmosphere, character and action, and also a wry commentary on the ambiguity of morality—as seen in Long...

  164. Une vie by Guy de Maupassant

    Une vie also known as L'Humble Vérité is the first novel written by Guy de Maupassant. It was serialised in 1883 in the Gil Blas, then published in book form the same year as L'Humble Vérité. It w...

  165. The Death of Ivan Ilyich by Leo Tolstoy

    The Death of Ivan Ilyich, first published in 1886, is a novella by Leo Tolstoy, one of the masterpieces of his late fiction, written shortly after his conversion to Christianity. The novel tells...

  166. Against Nature by J. K. Huysmans

    Study of obsession and aesthetics in fin-de-siecle France.

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  167. La Regenta by Clarín

    La Regenta is a realist novel by Spanish author Leopoldo Alas y Ureña, also known as Clarín, published in 1884 and 1885.

  168. Bel Ami by Guy de Maupassant

    Bel Ami is the second novel by French author Guy de Maupassant, published in 1885; an English translation titled Bel Ami, or, The History of a Scoundrel: A Novel first appeared in 1903. The story ...

  169. Marius the Epicurean by Walter Pater

    Marius the Epicurean: his sensations and ideas is a historical and philosophical novel by Walter Pater (his only completed full-length fiction), written between 1881 and 1884, published in 1885 and...

  170. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

    Revered by all of the town's children and dreaded by all of its mothers, Huckleberry Finn is indisputably the most appealing child-hero in American literature. Unlike the tall-tale, idyllic worl...

  171. Germinal by Émile Zola

    Germinal is the thirteenth novel in Émile Zola's twenty-volume series Les Rougon-Macquart. Often considered Zola's masterpiece and one of the most significant novels in the French tradition, the no...

  172. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

    King Solomon's Mines (1885) is a popular novel by the English Victorian adventure writer and fabulist Sir H. Rider Haggard. It tells of a search of an unexplored region of Africa by a group of adv...

  173. The Quest by Frederik van Eeden

    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and rema...

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  174. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

    Spawned by a nightmare that Stevenson had, this classic tale of the dark, primordial night of the soul remains a masterpiece of the duality of good and evil within us all.

  175. The House of Ulloa by Emilia Pardo Bazán

    The House of Ulloa (Spanish: Los pazos de Ulloa) is a novel by Emilia Pardo Bazán, published in Spanish in 1886, and in English by Penguin Classics in 1990. It was republished by Pocket Penguins in...

  176. Hemsöborna by August Strindberg

    The People of Hemsö (Swedish: Hemsöborna) is an 1887 novel by August Strindberg about the life of people of the island Hemsö in the Stockholm archipelago. Hemsö is a fictional island, but it is bas...

  177. Pierre et Jean by Guy de Maupassant

    Pierre et Jean is a naturalist or psycho-realist work written by Guy de Maupassant in Étretat in his native Normandy between June and September 1887 . This was Maupassant’s shortest novel. It appea...

  178. Under the Yoke by Ivan Vazov

    Under the Yoke [Bulgarian: 'Под игото'- Pod Igoto] is a novel by Ivan Vazov written in 1888. It is set in a small town in Central Bulgaria during the months leading up to the April Uprising in 1876...

  179. Il Piacere by Gabriele D'Annunzio

    Il Piacere (The Pleasure) is the first novel by Gabriele d'Annunzio, written in 1889 at Francavilla al Mare, and published the following year by Fratelli Treves. Beginning in 1895, the novel was re...

  180. Eline Vere by Louis Couperus

    Eline Vere is an 1889 novel by the Dutch writer Louis Couperus. It was adapted into the 1991 film Eline Vere, directed by Harry Kümel. Couperus wrote Eline Vere in the house at Surinamestraat 20, T...

  181. Hunger by Knut Hamsun

    Hunger is a novel by the Norwegian author Knut Hamsun and was published in its final form in 1890. Parts of it had been published anonymously in the Danish magazine Ny Jord in 1888. The novel is ha...

  182. By the Open Sea by August Strindberg

  183. La Bête humaine by Émile Zola

    La Bête humaine (English: The Beast Within or The Beast in Man) is an 1890 novel by Émile Zola. The story has been adapted for the cinema on several occasions. The seventeenth book in Zola's Les R...

  184. Thaïs by Anatole France

    Thaïs is a novel by French writer Anatole France, published in 1890. It is based on events in the life of Saint Thaïs of Egypt, a legendary convert to Christianity who is said to have lived in the ...

  185. The Kreutzer Sonata: And Other Stories by Leo Tolstoy

    Renowned Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy was never one to shy away from complex or unpopular ideas. In the title story of this exquisite collection, named for one of Beethoven's most intricate works, ...

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  186. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

    Celebrated novel traces the moral degeneration of a handsome young Londoner from an innocent fop into a cruel and reckless pursuer of pleasure and, ultimately, a murderer. As Dorian Gray sinks into...

  187. Down There by J. K. Huysmans

    Là-Bas, translated as Down There or The Damned, is a novel by the French writer Joris-Karl Huysmans, first published in 1891. It is Huysmans' most famous work after À rebours. Là-Bas deals with the...

  188. Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy

    Violated by one man, forsaken by another, Tess Durbeyfield is the magnificent and spirited heroine of Thomas Hardy’s immortal work. Of all the great English novelists, no one writes more eloquently...

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  189. Gösta Berling's Saga by Selma Lagerlöf

    Gösta Berling's Saga (Swedish: Gösta Berlings saga) is the debut novel of Swedish author Selma Lagerlöf, published in 1891. It was made into a 1924 silent film directed by Mauritz Stiller starring ...

  190. New Grub Street: A Novel by George Gissing

    New Grub Street is a novel by George Gissing published in 1891, which is set in the literary and journalistic circles of 1880s London. Gissing revised and shortened the novel for a French edition o...

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  191. News from Nowhere by William Morris

    News from Nowhere (1890) is a classic work combining utopian socialism and soft science fiction written by the artist, designer and socialist pioneer William Morris. It was first published in seria...

  192. The Complete Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle

    Since his first appearance in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has been one of the most beloved fictional characters ever created.

  193. The Diary of a Nobody by George Grossmith, Weedon Grossmith

    Weedon Grossmith's 1892 book presents the details of English suburban life through the anxious and accident-prone character of Charles Porter. Porter's diary chronicles his daily routine, which inc...

  194. The Viceroys by Federico De Roberto

    A lost literary classic, written in 1894, The Viceroys is one of the most acclaimed masterworks of Italian realism. The novel follows three generations of the aristocratic Uzeda family as it strugg...

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  195. Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy

    In 1895 Hardy’s final novel, the great tale of Jude the Obscure, sent shock waves of indignation rolling across Victorian England. Hardy had dared to write frankly about sexuality and to indict the...

  196. Effi Briest by Theodor Fontane

    Unworldly young Effi Briest is married off to Baron von Innstetten, an austere and ambitious civil servant twice her age, who has little time for his new wife. Isolated and bored, Effi finds comfor...

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  197. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells

    When the Time Traveler courageously stepped out of his machine for the first time, he found himself in the year 802,700--and everything had changed. H.G. Wells's famous novel of one man's astonishi...

  198. The Island of Doctor Moreau by H. G. Wells

    The Island of Doctor Moreau is an 1896 science fiction novel by English author H. G. Wells. The text of the novel is the narration of Edward Prendick, a shipwrecked man rescued by a passing boat wh...

  199. Quo Vadis by Henryk Sienkiewicz

    Quo Vadis: A Narrative of the Time of Nero, commonly known as Quo Vadis, is a historical novel written by Henryk Sienkiewicz in Polish. "Quo vadis, Domine?" is Latin for "Where are you going, Lord?...

  200. Dracula by Bram Stoker

    Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. Dracula has been attributed to many literary genres including vampire literat...

  201. What Maisie Knew by Henry James

    What Maisie Knew is a novel by Henry James, first published as a serial in The Chap-Book and (revised and abridged) in the New Review in 1897 and then as a book later that year. It tells the story ...

  202. Compassion by Benito Pérez Galdós

  203. Pharaoh by Bolesław Prus

    Pharaoh (Polish: Faraon) is the fourth and last major novel by the Polish writer Bolesław Prus (1847–1912). Composed over a year's time in 1894–95, serialized in 1895–96, and published in book form...

  204. The Fruits of the Earth by André Gide

    The Fruits of the Earth (French: Les nourritures terrestres) is a prose-poem by André Gide, published in France in 1897. The book was written in 1895 (the year of Gide's marriage) and appeared in ...

  205. War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells

    When four Martian space ships land in England, masses of people flee the cities, driven by an overwhelming fear of the alien creatures devastating weapons of death and destruction. Excellently adap...

  206. Senilità by Italo Svevo

    Senilità, translated into English as As a Man Grows Older or Emilio's Carnival, is Italo Svevo's second novel, first published in 1898. The novel's protagonist is Emilio Brentani, a failed writer t...

  207. Dom Casmurro by Machado de Assis

    Dom Casmurro, written by Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, was first published in Brazil in 1899. Like The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas and Quincas Borba, both by Machado de Assis, it is a master...

  208. The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    First published in 1899, this novel shocked readers with its open sensuality and uninhibited treatment of marital infidelity. Poignant and lyrical, it tells the story of a New Orleans wife who atte...

  209. The Stechlin by Theodor Fontane

    First English translation of the final work of Theodor Fontane, one of Germany's most significant novelists.

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  210. Eclipse of the Crescent Moon by Géza Gárdonyi

    Eclipse of the Crescent Moon (Hungarian: Egri csillagok lit. "Stars of Eger") is a historical novel by the Hungarian writer Géza Gárdonyi. It was first published in 1899 and is one of the most popu...

  211. Some Experiences of an Irish R. M. by Edith Somerville, Violet Florence Martin

    The Irish R.M. refers to a series of books by the Anglo-Irish novelists Somerville and Ross, and the television comedy-drama series based on them. They are set in the turn-of-the-twentieth-century ...

  212. Sandokan by Emilio Salgari

    Sandokan is a fictional late 19th-century pirate created by Italian author Emilio Salgari. His adventures first appeared in publication in 1883. Sandokan is the protagonist of 11 adventure novels....

  213. Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser

    When a girl leaves home at eighteen, she does one of two things. Either she falls into saving hands and becomes better, or she rapidly assumes the cosmopolitan standard of virtue and becomes worse....

  214. None but the Brave by Arthur Schnitzler

  215. Kim by Rudyard Kipling

    Kim is an orphan, living from hand to mouth in the teeming streets of Lahore. One day he meets a man quite unlike anything in his wide experience, a Tibetan lama on a quest. Kim's life suddenly acq...

  216. Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann

    Buddenbrooks was Thomas Mann's first novel, published in 1901 when he was twenty-six years old. It portrays the downfall (already announced in the subtitle, Decline of a family) of a wealthy mer...

  217. The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle

    The Hound of the Baskervilles is a crime novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes. Originally serialized in the Strand Magazine from August 1901 to April 1902, it ...

  218. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

    The story details an incident when Marlow, an Englishman, took a foreign assignment from a Belgian trading company as a ferry-boat captain in Africa. Although Conrad does not specify the name of th...

  219. Wings of the Dove by Henry James

    One of the masterpieces of James' final period, this novel tells the story of Milly Theale, an American heiress stricken with a serious disease, and her impact on the people around her. Some of the...

  220. The Immoralist by André Gide

    The Immoralist (French: L'Immoraliste) is a novel by André Gide, published in France in 1902.

  221. The Ambassadors by Henry James

    This dark comedy, one of the masterpieces of James' final period, follows the trip of protagonist Lewis Lambert Strether to Europe in pursuit of his widowed fiancée's supposedly wayward son. Streth...

  222. Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers

    A simple invitation to join his friend Davies on a yachting expedition in the Baltic is the beginning of an extraordinary and dangerous adventure for the bored and worldly but clever Carruthers. As...

  223. The Call of the Wild by Jack London

    The plot concerns a previously domesticated and even somewhat pampered dog named Buck, whose primordial instincts return after a series of events finds him serving as a sled dog in the treacherous...

  224. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness by Daniel Paul Schreber

    In 1884, the distinguished German jurist Daniel Paul Schreber suffered the first of a series of mental collapses that would afflict him for the rest of his life. In his madness, the world was revea...

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  225. Way of All Flesh by Samuel Butler

    'The Way of All Flesh' 'exploded like a bomb' in Edwardian England. Based on Samuel Butler's own life and published posthumously, it indicts Victorian bourgeois values as personified in five genera...

  226. Hadrian the Seventh by Frederick Rolfe

    One day George Arthur Rose, hack writer and minor priest, discovers that he has been picked to be Pope. He is hardly surprised and not in the least daunted. "The previous English pontiff was Hadria...

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  227. Nostromo by Joseph Conrad

    Edited with an introduction and notes by Martin Seymour-Smith. In his evocation of the republic of Costaguana, set amid the exotic and grandiose scenery of South America, Conrad reveals not only th...

  228. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton

    From the esteemed author of The Age of Innocence--a black comedy about vast wealth and a woman who can define herself only through the perceptions of others. Lily Bart's quest to find a husband who...

  229. Professor Unrat by Heinrich Mann

    Professor Unrat (1905, trans. by Ernest Boyd as Small Town Tyrant), which translates as "Professor Garbage," is one of the most important works of Heinrich Mann and has achieved notoriety through f...

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  230. Solitude by Caterina Albert

    The story of a woman's emotional awakening amid the inhospitable Catalan mountains.

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  231. The Confusions of Young Törless by Robert Musil

    'between the life we live and the life we feel...there is the invisible border, like a narrow gate' Set in a boarding school in a remote area of the Habsburg Empire at the turn of the last century,...

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  232. The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy

    The Forsyte Saga, first published under that name in 1922, is a series of three novels and two interludes published between 1906 and 1921 by Nobel Prize-winning English author John Galsworthy. They...

  233. The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

    1906 best-seller shockingly reveals intolerable labor practices and unsanitary working conditions in the Chicago stockyards as it tells the brutally grim story of a Slavic family that emigrates to ...

  234. The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad

    In a corrupt London underworld of criminals, terrorists, and fanatics, Mr. Verloc is assigned to plant a bomb. The tragic repercussions for his family show how Conrad's ironic voice is concerned no...

  235. Mother by Maksim Gorky

    Mother (Russian: Мать) is a novel written by Maxim Gorky in 1906 about revolutionary factory workers. It was first published, in English, in Appleton's Magazine in 1906, then in Russian in 1907. T...

  236. The House on the Borderland by Frances Hodgson Burnett

    The House on the Borderland (1908) is a supernatural horror novel by British fantasist William Hope Hodgson. The novel is a hallucinatory account of a recluse's stay at a remote house, and his expe...

  237. The Old Wives' Tale by Arnold Bennett

    It deals with the lives of two very different sisters, Constance and Sophia Baines, following their stories from their youth, working in their mother's draper's shop, into old age. It is generally ...

  238. Hell by Henri Barbusse

    Hell (French: L'Enfer) is Henri Barbusse's second novel, written in 1908, in which the unnamed narrator spies on his fellow house guests through a peephole in his wall.

  239. A Room With a View by E. M. Forster

    British social comedy examines a young heroine's struggle against strait-laced Victorian attitudes as she rejects the man her family has encouraged her to marry and chooses, instead, a socially uns...

  240. Strait is the Gate by André Gide

    Strait is the Gate (French: La Porte Étroite) is a 1909 French novel written by André Gide. It was translated into English by Dorothy Bussy. It probes the complexities and terrors of adolescence an...

  241. The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge by Rainer Maria Rilke

    This is the definitive, widely acclaimed translation of the major prose work of one of our century's greatest poets -- "a masterpiece like no other" (Elizabeth Hardwick) -- Rilke's only novel, extr...

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  242. Howards End by E. M. Forster

    "Only Connect," Forster's key aphorism, informs this novel about an English country house, Howards End, and its influence on the lives of the wealthy and materialistic Wilcoxes; the cultured, ideal...

  243. Impressions of Africa by Raymond Roussel

    The first of Roussel's two major prose works, Impressions of Africa is not, as the title may suggest, a conventional travel account, but an adventure story put together in a highly individual fashi...

  244. Fantômas by Marcel Allain, Pierre Souvestre

    Fantômas (French: [fɑ̃tomas]) is a fictional character created by French writers Marcel Allain (1885–1969) and Pierre Souvestre (1874–1914). One of the most popular characters in the history of Fr...

  245. Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton

    Tragic story of wasted lives, set against a bleak New England background. A poverty-stricken New England farmer, his ailing wife and a youthful housekeeper are drawn relentlessly into a deep-rooted...

  246. The Charwoman's Daughter by James Stephens

    The Charwoman's Daughter is the strange wistful story of sixteen-year-old Mary, the only child of her fiercely protective, widowed mother.... Mary and her mother live in a one-room tenement flat th...

  247. Death in Venice by Thomas Mann

    The novella Death in Venice was written by the German author Thomas Mann, and was first published in 1912 as Der Tod in Venedig. It was first published in English in 1925 as Death in Venice and Oth...

  248. Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence

    Sons and Lovers is one of the landmark novels of the twentieth century. When it appeared in 1913, it was immediately recognized as the first great modern restatement of the oedipal drama, and it is...

  249. The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists by Robert Tressell, Peter Miles

    This novel tells the story of a group of working men who are joined one day by Owen, a journeyman-prophet with a vision of a just society. Owen's spirited attacks on the greed and dishonesty of the...

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  250. Platero by Juan Ramón Jiménez

    Platero is the eponymous donkey of the 1914 story Platero y yo (Spanish for Platero and I). The book is one of the most popular works by Spanish poet Juan Ramón Jiménez, the recipient of the 1956 N...

  251. Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs

    Tarzan of the Apes is a novel written by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first in a series of books about the title character Tarzan. It was first published in the pulp magazine All-Story Magazine in Oct...

  252. Locus Solus by Raymond Roussel

    Locus Solus is a 1914 French novel by Raymond Roussel.

  253. Kokoro by Sōseki Natsume

    Haunted by tragic secrets, Sensei slowly opens up to his young disciple, confessing indiscretions from his own student days that have left him reeling with guilt.

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  254. The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan

    In The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915), the best-known of his thrillers (made into a popular movie by Alfred Hitchcock), John Buchan introduces his most enduring hero, Richard Hannay, who, despite claimin...

  255. The Rainbow by D. H. Lawrence

    Set in the rural midlands of England, The Rainbow revolves around three generations of the Brangwen family over a period of more than sixty years, setting them against the emergence of modern Engla...

  256. Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham

    The first and most autobiographical of Maugham's masterpieces. It is the story of Philip Carey, an orphan eager for life, love and adventure. After a few months studying in Heidelberg, and a brief ...

  257. The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford

    Ford Madox Ford wrote The Good Soldier, the book on which his reputation most surely rests, in deliberate emulation of the nineteenth-century French novels he so admired. In this way he was able to...

  258. Rashomon and Seventeen Other Stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa

    Ryünosuke Akutagawa (1892-1927) is one of Japan’s foremost stylists - a modernist master whose short stories are marked by highly original imagery, cynicism, beauty and wild humour. ‘Rashömon’ and ...

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  259. Under Fire by Henri Barbusse

    Under Fire: The Story of a Squad (French: Le Feu: journal d'une escouade) by Henri Barbusse (December 1916), was one of the first novels about World War I to be published. Although it is fiction, t...

  260. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a semi-autobiographical novel by James Joyce, first serialized in The Egoist from 1914 to 1915 and published in book form in 1916. It depicts the formativ...

  261. The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela

    The Underdogs (Spanish: Los de Abajo) is a novel by Mexican author Mariano Azuela which tells the story of a group of commoners who are dragged into the Mexican Revolution and the changes in their ...

  262. Pallieter by Felix Timmermans

    Pallieter is a regional novel by the Flemish writer and poet Felix Timmermans , published in 1916. The novel is named after his main character Pallieter, a bon vivant who lives under the motto 'sei...

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  263. Home and the World by Rabindranath Tagore

    Set against the backdrop of the Partition of Bengal by the British in 1905, Home and the World (Ghare Baire) is the story of a young liberal-minded zamindar Nikhilesh, his educated and sensitive wi...

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  264. Growth of the Soil by Knut Hamsun

    The Growth of the Soil (Norwegian Markens Grøde) is the novel by Norwegian writer Knut Hamsun which won him the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1920. - Wikipedia

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  265. The Return of the Soldier by Rebecca West

    The Return of the Soldier is the debut novel of English novelist Rebecca West, first published in 1918. The novel recounts the return of the shell shocked Captain Chris Baldry from the trenches of ...

  266. Tarr by Wyndham Lewis

    Tarr is a modernist novel by Wyndham Lewis, written in 1909–11, revised and expanded in 1914–15 and first serialized in the magazine The Egoist from April 1916 until November 1917. The American ver...

  267. Storm of Steel by Ernst Jünger

    Storm of Steel (in German: In Stahlgewittern) is the memoir of German officer Ernst Jünger's experiences on the Western Front during the First World War. It was originally printed privately in 1920...

  268. Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence

    Perhaps no other of the world’s great writers lived and wrote with the passionate intensity of D. H. Lawrence. And perhaps no other of his books so explores the mysteries between men and women–both...

  269. Main Street by Sinclair Lewis

    In this classic satire of small-town America, beautiful young Carol Kennicott comes to Gopher Prairie, Minnesota, with dreams of transforming the provincial old town into a place of beauty and cult...

  270. The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

    The Age of Innocence centers on an upperclass couple's impending marriage, and the introduction of a scandalous woman whose presence threatens their happiness. Though the novel questions the assump...

  271. Crome Yellow by Aldous Huxley

    Crome Yellow is the first novel by British author Aldous Huxley, published in 1921. In the book, Huxley satirises the fads and fashions of the time. It is the story of a house party at Crome, a pa...

  272. Life of Christ by Giovanni Papini

    Giovanni Papini's "Life of Christ" was the number two non-fiction best seller in the year 1923. Papini gained international fame with his religious novel "Storio Di Christo" and this, the English t...

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  273. Ulysses by James Joyce

    Ulysses chronicles the passage of Leopold Bloom through Dublin during an ordinary day, June 16, 1904. The title parallels and alludes to Odysseus (Latinised into Ulysses), the hero of Homer's Odyss...

  274. Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis

    When Babbitt was first published in 1922, fans gleefully hailed its scathing portrait of a crass, materialistic nation; critics denounced it as an unfair skewering of the American businessman. Spar...

  275. Claudine by Colette

    The Claudine series consists of four early novels by the French author Colette, published 1900–1904. Written in diary form, they describe the growth to maturity of a young girl, Claudine. Aged fift...

  276. Life and Death of Harriett Frean by May Sinclair

    The Life and Death of Harriett Frean (ISBN 0-86068-106-8) is a 1922 novel by English author May Sinclair.

  277. Forest of the Hanged by Liviu Rebreanu

    Forest of the Hanged (Romanian: Pădurea spânzuraților) is a novel by Romanian writer Liviu Rebreanu. Published in 1922, it is partly inspired by the experience of his brother Emil Rebreanu, an offi...

  278. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

    Classic novel that has inspired generations of seekers. Blending Eastern mysticism and psychoanalysis, Hesse presents a strikingly original view of man and culture and the arduous process of self-d...

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  279. The Enormous Room by E. E. Cummings

    The Enormous Room (The Green-Eyed Stores) is a 1922 autobiographical novel by the poet and novelist E. E. Cummings about his temporary imprisonment in France during World War I. Cummings served as...

  280. Kristin Lavransdatter by Sigrid Undset

    The turbulent historical masterpiece of Norway’s literary master In her great historical epic Kristin Lavransdatter, set in fourteenth-century Norway, Nobel laureate Sigrid Undset tells the life st...

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  281. Amok by Stefan Zweig

    The nameless first person narrator travels from India to Europe on the ocean liner Oceania in 1912. One night, during a walk on deck, he meets a man who, disturbed and scared, avoids any social con...

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  282. Le Diable au corps by Raymond Radiguet

    Le Diable au corps (The Devil in the Flesh) is an early 1923 novel by Parisian literary prodigy Raymond Radiguet. The story of a young married woman who has an affair with a sixteen-year-old boy wh...

  283. Confessions of Zeno by Italo Svevo

    Zeno's Conscience is a novel by Italian businessman and author Italo Svevo. The main character is Zeno Cosini and the book is the fictional character's memoirs that he keeps at the insistence of hi...

  284. A Passage to India by E. M. Forster

    A Passage to India is set against the backdrop of the British Raj and the Indian independence movement in the 1920s. The story revolves around four characters: Dr. Aziz, his British friend Cyril Fi...

  285. We by Yevgeny Zamyatin

    Translated by Natasha Randall Foreword by Bruce Sterling Written in 1921, We is set in the One State, where all live for the collective good and individual freedom does not exist. The novel takes t...

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  286. The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann

    The Magic Mountain is a novel by Thomas Mann, first published in November 1924. It is widely considered to be one of the most influential works of 20th century German literature.

  287. The Green Hat by Michael Arlen

    The Green Hat perfectly reflects the atmosphere of the 1920s—the post-war fashion for verbal smartness, youthful cynicism, and the spirit of rebellion of the "bright young things" of Mayfair. Iris ...

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  288. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes: The Illuminating Diary of a Professional Lady by Anita Loos

    The incomparable adventures of Lorelei Lee, a little girl from Little Rock who takes the world by storm. Anita Loos first published the diaries of the ultimate gold-digging blonde in the flapper da...

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  289. The Professor's House by Willa Cather

    The Professor's House is a novel by American novelist Willa Cather. Published in 1925, the novel was written over the course of several years. Cather first wrote the centerpiece, “Tom Outland's Sto...

  290. The Artamonov Business by Maksim Gorky

    The Artamonov Business (Russian: Дело Артамоновых, romanized: Delo Artamonovykh) is a 1941 Soviet drama film directed by Grigori Roshal.

  291. The Trial by Franz Kafka

    Written in 1914, The Trial is one of the most important novels of the twentieth century: the terrifying tale of Josef K., a respectable bank officer who is suddenly and inexplicably arrested and mu...

  292. The Counterfeiters by André Gide

    The Counterfeiters is a 1925 novel by French author André Gide, first published in Nouvelle Revue Française. With many characters and crisscrossing plotlines, its main theme is that of the original...

  293. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    The novel chronicles an era that Fitzgerald himself dubbed the "Jazz Age". Following the shock and chaos of World War I, American society enjoyed unprecedented levels of prosperity during the "roar...

  294. Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

    Created from two short stories, "Mrs Dalloway in Bond Street" and the unfinished "The Prime Minister", the novel's story is of Clarissa's preparations for a party of which she is to be hostess. Wit...

  295. Chaka by Thomas Mofolo

    Chaka is the most famous novel by the writer Thomas Mofolo of Lesotho. Written in Sotho, it is a mythic retelling of the story of the rise and fall of the Zulu emperor-king Shaka. It was named one ...

  296. The Making of Americans by Gertrude Stein

    "Essential for all literature collections . . . Several of Stein's titles returned to print in 1995, but none more important than The Making of Americans." Library Journal

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  297. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie

    Agatha Christie's ginius for detective fiction is unparalleled. Her worldwide popularity is phenomenal, her characters engaging, her plots spellbinding. No one knows the human heart—or the dark pas...

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  298. One, No One and One Hundred Thousand by Luigi Pirandello

    One, No One and One Hundred Thousand (Italian: Uno, Nessuno e Centomila [ˈuːno nesˈsuːno e ˌtʃɛntoˈmiːla]) is a 1926 novel by the Italian writer Luigi Pirandello. The novel had a rather long and di...

  299. Under Satan's Sun by Georges Bernanos

    This new translation marks the seventy-fifth anniversary of Georges Bernanos's first novel, Under Satan's Sun, a powerful account of intense spiritual struggle that reflects the author's deeply-fel...

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  300. The Good Soldier Svejk by Jaroslav Hašek

    The Good Soldier Švejk is the abbreviated title of an unfinished satirical novel by Jaroslav Hašek. It was illustrated by Josef Lada and George Grosz after Hašek's death. The original Czech title o...

  301. The Alberta Trilogy by Cora Sandel

    Imaginative and intelligent, Alberta is a misfit trapped in a stiflingly provincial town in the far north of Norway whose only affinity is for her extrovert brother Jacob.

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  302. The Castle by Franz Kafka

    The Castle is a novel by Franz Kafka. In it a protagonist, known only as K., struggles to gain access to the mysterious authorities of a castle who govern the village where he wants to work as a la...

  303. Blindness by Henry Green

    "Blindness is a major novel . . . Every character and every scene is shot through with significance after significance." The Times [London]

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  304. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

    The novel explores the lives and values of the so-called "Lost Generation," chronicling the experiences of Jake Barnes and several acquaintances on their pilgrimage to Pamplona for the annual San F...

  305. Amerika by Franz Kafka

    Karl Rossman has been banished by his parents to America, following a family scandal. There, with unquenchable optimism, he throws himself into the strange experiences that lie before him as he slo...

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