The Greatest "Maine" Books of All Time

Click to learn how this list is calculated.

This list represents a comprehensive and trusted collection of the greatest books. Developed through a specialized algorithm, it brings together 268 'best of' book lists to form a definitive guide to the world's most acclaimed books. For those interested in how these books are chosen, additional details can be found on the rankings page.

Filter by: Genres Dates Countries

Genres

Maine

Add additional genre filters

Countries

Date Range

Filter

Reading Statistics

Click the button below to see how many of these books you've read!

Download

If you're interested in downloading this list as a CSV file for use in a spreadsheet application, you can easily do so by clicking the button below. Please note that to ensure a manageable file size and faster download, the CSV will include details for only the first 500 books.

Download
  1. 1. It by Stephen King

    A group of seven childhood friends, known as The Losers Club, come together in their small hometown to confront an evil entity that they first battled as children. This malevolent force, which often takes the form of a terrifying clown, preys on the children of their town by exploiting their deepest fears. The friends must confront their own personal demons and past traumas in order to once again face this entity, and the novel alternates between their childhood and adult experiences with this evil.

  2. 2. Salem's Lot by Stephen King

    In a small town called Salem's Lot, a writer returns to his childhood home to find that the town is being plagued by a mysterious evil force. As the residents slowly succumb to the darkness, a group of unlikely heroes must band together to fight against the ancient and powerful vampire who is responsible for the town's descent into chaos. With a chilling atmosphere and intense suspense, this novel explores the themes of fear, loss, and the battle between good and evil.

  3. 3. The Cider House Rules by John Irving

    This novel tells the story of Dr. Wilbur Larch—saint and obstetrician, founder and director of the orphanage in the town of St. Cloud's, Maine, and a man of rare compassion and an addiction to ether. Dr. Larch loves all his orphans, especially Homer Wells, who is never adopted and becomes his invaluable apprentice. As Homer comes of age, he must leave the only home he's ever known to explore the world outside, a world filled with temptations and moral dilemmas, from the struggle over abortion to the question of what constitutes a family.

  4. 4. Carrie by Stephen King

    A young high school girl with telekinetic abilities is mercilessly bullied and isolated by her classmates and religious fanatic mother. After a particularly humiliating incident at her senior prom, she uses her powers in a fit of rage and despair, leading to a terrifying and catastrophic event that devastates her small town.

  5. 5. On Writing by Stephen King

    This book is a memoir that serves as a guide for aspiring writers. The author shares his journey as a writer, his struggles, and his successes, while also providing practical advice on the craft of writing. It delves into the mechanics of writing, the importance of reading, the role of an editor, and the perseverance required to be a successful writer. The book also discusses the author's near-fatal accident and how it impacted his writing process, emphasizing the importance of resilience and dedication to the craft.

  6. 6. Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout

    The book is a collection of 13 interconnected short stories revolving around Olive Kitteridge, a retired schoolteacher living in a small town in Maine. Olive is a complex character with a prickly exterior but a deep well of emotion and empathy beneath the surface. Through her interactions and relationships with various town residents, the book explores themes of love, loss, aging, and change, painting a rich portrait of a community and its inhabitants.

  7. 7. Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan

    This is a heartwarming story set in the late 19th century about a widower and his two children living on the prairie who place an ad for a wife and mother. A woman named Sarah from Maine responds and comes to live with them for a trial period. Over time, Sarah, who is described as plain and tall, forms a bond with the children and the father, and despite her longing for the sea, she decides to stay and become a part of their family.

  8. 8. The Country of the Pointed Firs by Sarah Orne Jewett

    "The Country of the Pointed Firs" is a series of sketches about life in a small coastal town in Maine. The narrator, a woman writer who is spending the summer in the town, introduces readers to the local characters and their stories. The book explores themes of community, solitude, time, and the natural world, painting a vivid picture of rural life at the turn of the 20th century.

  9. 9. The Country Of The Pointed Firs And Other Stories by Sarah Orne Jewett

    This book is a collection of sketches and stories that capture the essence of life in a small coastal village in Maine at the turn of the 20th century. Through the eyes of a summer visitor, the narrative delicately weaves together the lives, traditions, and landscapes of the region, offering a poignant look at the bonds between the people and the place they call home. Rich with local color and characterized by a gentle, contemplative pace, the work celebrates the beauty of the natural world and the simple, enduring values of a tight-knit community.

  10. 10. Nickel And Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich

    The book is a firsthand journalistic account of the author's experiment to survive on minimum wage jobs in America. She gives up her middle-class life to understand the reality of low-wage workers, working as a waitress, a hotel maid, a cleaning woman, a nursing home aide, and a retail chain employee. The book reveals the harsh and often overlooked conditions of the working poor, highlighting the struggle to afford even basic necessities, the lack of job security, and the physical toll of such work.

  11. 11. 11 22 63 by Stephen King

    "11/22/63" is a science fiction novel by Stephen King that follows the story of Jake Epping, a high school English teacher who discovers a portal that leads to 1958. After being convinced by his friend Al to use the portal to prevent the assassination of John F. Kennedy, Jake embarks on a journey through time to change the course of history. Along the way, he falls in love with a woman named Sadie and faces various obstacles that threaten to alter the timeline he is trying to change. The book explores themes of love, loss, and the consequences of trying to change the past.

  12. 12. A Midwife's Tale by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

    "A Midwife's Tale" is a historical account of a midwife's life in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, based on her detailed diary entries. The book offers a unique perspective on the daily life, medical practices, and social and economic conditions of the time, while highlighting the significant role that women played in the community, despite their limited rights and opportunities. The narrative also provides a rare insight into the realities of childbirth and women's health during this period.

  13. 13. Dead Zone by Stephen King

    The novel revolves around a schoolteacher who awakens from a coma with the extraordinary ability to see into the past and future of individuals he touches, a power that comes with heavy burdens and moral dilemmas. As he grapples with his newfound gift, he becomes increasingly disturbed by a vision involving an ambitious and dangerous politician. The teacher must decide whether to take drastic action to prevent the apocalyptic future he foresees, questioning the ethics of fate and free will, and whether it is ever justifiable to take one life to save many.

  14. 14. Cost by Roxana Robinson

    "Cost" is a gripping novel that explores the devastating impact of drug addiction on a family. The story centers around a mother who is a painter, her two grown sons, one of whom is a heroin addict, and her elderly parents. The narrative delves into the complexities of familial relationships, the struggles of dealing with addiction, and the harsh realities of aging, all set against the backdrop of a summer in Maine. The family's struggle to help their addicted son while dealing with their own personal issues provides a heart-wrenching exploration of love, responsibility, and the true cost of choices made.

  15. 15. Dolores Claiborne by Stephen King

    This novel is a gripping psychological thriller that unfolds through the confession of its titular character, a housekeeper accused of murdering her wealthy employer. Set on a small island in Maine, the story delves deep into the protagonist's past, revealing a life marred by domestic abuse, a desperate act of violence to protect her children, and a complex relationship with her employer. The narrative, devoid of chapters and told entirely in the protagonist's voice, creates an intimate and compelling exploration of guilt, survival, and the lengths to which a person will go to escape a life of despair. Through its vivid character study and suspenseful plot, the novel examines themes of justice, loyalty, and the enduring impact of secrets.

  16. 16. One Man's Meat by E. B. White

    This collection of essays is a charming and insightful chronicle of the author's experiences and observations while living on a farm in Maine during World War II. Filled with humor and wisdom, the essays cover a wide range of topics, from the challenges of raising livestock and growing crops, to reflections on nature, literature, and the changing seasons. The author's thoughtful and poetic writing provides a unique perspective on rural life and the human condition.

  17. 17. The Body by Stephen King

    The novella follows four young friends in a small town in Maine who embark on a quest to find the body of a missing boy. Set in the 1960s, the story is a coming-of-age tale that explores themes of friendship, mortality, and the loss of innocence. As the boys journey through the woods, encountering various obstacles and reflecting on their personal struggles and fears, they confront the harsh realities of the adult world and the inevitability of change. The narrative delves deep into the characters' psyches, revealing their innermost thoughts and the bonds that tie them together, while also painting a poignant picture of childhood's end.

  18. 18. Tinkers by Paul Harding

    "Tinkers" is a novel that explores the life of a dying clock repairman who reflects on his life, his father, and his own sons. The narrative moves through time, providing glimpses into the past, from the protagonist's childhood to his own father's experiences as a tinker selling household goods. The story is a poignant examination of family, memory, and death, set against the backdrop of New England's changing seasons.

  19. 19. Cujo by Stephen King

    This novel revolves around a once-friendly Saint Bernard that contracts rabies and becomes a terrifying force in a small American town. The story focuses on the dog's descent into madness and the impact on the people around him, particularly a mother and her young son who become trapped by the rabid dog. As the situation escalates, the characters are forced to confront their deepest fears and fight for survival. The narrative explores themes of love, fear, and the unpredictability of violence in everyday life, all while delivering suspenseful and heart-wrenching moments.

Reading Statistics

Click the button below to see how many of these books you've read!

Download

If you're interested in downloading this list as a CSV file for use in a spreadsheet application, you can easily do so by clicking the button below. Please note that to ensure a manageable file size and faster download, the CSV will include details for only the first 500 books.

Download