The Greatest "Medicine" Books of All Time

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This list represents a comprehensive and trusted collection of the greatest books. Developed through a specialized algorithm, it brings together 280 'best of' book lists to form a definitive guide to the world's most acclaimed books. For those interested in how these books are chosen, additional details can be found on the rankings page.

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Medicine

The "Medicine" category of books encompasses a wide range of topics related to healthcare, including medical research, clinical practice, pharmacology, and public health. These books may cover topics such as disease prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and management, as well as the social, ethical, and political issues surrounding healthcare. The category includes both academic and popular works, and is intended for healthcare professionals, students, and anyone interested in learning more about medicine and healthcare.

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  1. 1. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

    Madame Bovary is a tragic novel about a young woman, Emma Bovary, who is married to a dull, but kind-hearted doctor. Dissatisfied with her life, she embarks on a series of extramarital affairs and indulges in a luxurious lifestyle in an attempt to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life. Her desire for passion and excitement leads her down a path of financial ruin and despair, ultimately resulting in a tragic end.

  2. 2. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

    This classic novel tells the story of a young scientist who creates a grotesque but sentient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. The scientist, horrified by his creation, abandons it, leading the creature to seek revenge. The novel explores themes of ambition, responsibility, guilt, and the potential consequences of playing God.

  3. 3. Journey to the End of The Night by Louis-Ferdinand Céline

    The novel is a semi-autobiographical work that explores the harsh realities of life through the cynical and disillusioned eyes of the protagonist. The narrative follows his experiences from the trenches of World War I, through the African jungles, to the streets of America and the slums of Paris, showcasing the horrors of war, colonialism, and the dark side of human nature. The protagonist's journey is marked by his struggle with despair, loneliness, and the absurdity of existence, offering a bleak yet profound commentary on the human condition.

  4. 4. Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak

    Set against the tumultuous backdrop of the Russian Revolution, the book follows the life of a physician and poet, Yuri Zhivago, as he navigates the political and social upheaval of the early 20th century. Torn between his love for two women, his wife Tonya and his passionate mistress Lara, Zhivago's personal struggles mirror the larger societal changes occurring around him. The novel explores themes of love, war, and the human spirit, offering a poignant and complex portrait of life during a time of revolutionary change.

  5. 5. The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud

    This groundbreaking work explores the theory that dreams are a reflection of the unconscious mind and a means of understanding our deepest desires, anxieties, and fantasies. The book delves into the symbolism of dreams and their connection to repressed thoughts and experiences, proposing that they are a form of wish fulfillment. The author also introduces the concept of "dream work," which transforms these unconscious thoughts into the content of dreams, and discusses various methods of dream interpretation.

  6. 6. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

    This classic novel explores the duality of human nature through the story of a respected London doctor who creates a potion that transforms him into a sinister, violent alter ego. As the doctor increasingly loses control over when the transformations occur, his alter ego's evil deeds escalate, causing havoc in the community. The narrative is a chilling exploration of humanity's capacity for evil and the struggle for individuals to reconcile their public personas with their private desires.

  7. 7. Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham

    The novel follows the life of Philip Carey, a club-footed orphan who struggles with his disability and his passionate and unrequited love for a destructive woman. His journey takes him from a strict religious upbringing in England to an adventurous life in Paris where he attempts to become an artist before finally settling into a career in medicine. The story is a powerful exploration of human desire, ambition, and the search for meaning in life.

  8. 8. The Elements of Style by E. B. White, William Strunk Jr.

    This book is a definitive guide and classic manual on the principles of English language read by millions of readers. The 18 main topics are organized under headings such as Elementary Rules of Usage, Elementary Principles of Composition, A Few Matters of Form, Words and Expressions Commonly Misused, and An Approach to Style. The book's unique tone, wit and charm have conveyed the principles of English style to millions of readers, making it a beloved resource for those who want to write clear, correct and effective prose.

  9. 9. Main Street by Sinclair Lewis

    This novel is a satirical critique of small-town life, following the story of a young, ambitious woman who moves from the city to a quiet, conservative town in the Midwest with her new husband. Despite her attempts to bring culture and progress to the town, she is met with resistance and ostracism from the closed-minded locals. The protagonist's struggle against traditional norms and her ultimate disillusionment highlight the stifling conformity and lack of intellectual stimulation in rural America.

  10. 10. Maus by Art Spiegelman

    This graphic novel tells the story of a Holocaust survivor, as narrated by his son. The unique use of animals to represent different nationalities and ethnic groups adds a distinctive layer to the narrative. The protagonist's father recounts his experiences as a Polish Jew during World War II, offering a poignant depiction of the horrors of the Holocaust. The narrative also explores the complex father-son relationship, revealing the impact of such traumatic historical events on subsequent generations.

  11. 11. The Varieties of Religious Experience by Will James

    This book is an exploration of the diverse range of religious experiences, from the mainstream to the mystical. The author applies a psychological and philosophical approach, examining the individual, personal experiences of spirituality rather than organized religion. The book covers topics such as conversion, saintliness, and mysticism, and argues that religious experiences, rather than religious institutions, should be the primary focus of religious study.

  12. 12. Eminent Victorians by Lytton Strachey

    "Eminent Victorians" is a biographical work that profiles four influential figures from the Victorian era. The book provides an in-depth look into the lives of Cardinal Manning, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Arnold, and General Gordon, exploring their respective contributions to British society during the 19th century. Through these portraits, the book offers a critical and often satirical analysis of Victorian values, institutions, and moral attitudes, challenging the idealized narrative of the era.

  13. 13. The Principles of Psychology by Will James

    This comprehensive work delves into the complex subject of psychology and its fundamental principles. The author explores a wide range of topics including the functions of the brain, habits, the stream of consciousness, the self, attention, memory, and emotions. He combines philosophy and psychology to present a detailed analysis of human behavior and thought processes. The book is considered a classic in the field of psychology and continues to influence modern psychological theory.

  14. 14. Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh

    This novel follows the story of Paul Pennyfeather, a young man studying at Oxford University who is unfairly expelled and forced to take a job as a teacher at a chaotic school in Wales. His life takes a turn when he meets a wealthy widow and gets sucked into the high society lifestyle, only to be betrayed and sent to prison. The narrative is a satirical critique of the British class system, education, and the moral corruption of the rich.

  15. 15. The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care by Benjamin Spock

    This book is a comprehensive guide to child rearing, offering practical advice and information on a wide range of topics, including feeding, sleeping, health, discipline, and psychological development. It emphasizes a flexible, common-sense approach to parenting, encouraging parents to trust their own instincts and knowledge of their child. The book also discusses the importance of treating children as individuals and fostering their independence and self-confidence.

  16. 16. Sexual Behavior in the Human Male by Alfred C. Kinsey

    This book is a groundbreaking scientific study that provides an in-depth analysis of human male sexual behavior. It presents a comprehensive survey of male sexual activities and preferences, based on thousands of interviews and case studies. The book challenges many societal norms and taboos of its time by revealing the diversity and complexity of male sexual practices. It also explores the psychological, social, and biological factors that influence male sexuality.

  17. 17. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks

    The book is a collection of clinical tales about patients suffering from a variety of neurological disorders. The author, a neurologist, shares his experiences with these patients, whose conditions range from common ailments like amnesia and aphasia, to rare disorders like visual agnosia and Tourette's Syndrome. The stories are both compassionate and insightful, revealing the complexities of the human brain and the resilience of the human spirit, even in the face of debilitating illness.

  18. 18. The Cider House Rules by John Irving

    This novel tells the story of Dr. Wilbur Larch—saint and obstetrician, founder and director of the orphanage in the town of St. Cloud's, Maine, and a man of rare compassion and an addiction to ether. Dr. Larch loves all his orphans, especially Homer Wells, who is never adopted and becomes his invaluable apprentice. As Homer comes of age, he must leave the only home he's ever known to explore the world outside, a world filled with temptations and moral dilemmas, from the struggle over abortion to the question of what constitutes a family.

  19. 19. Civilization and Its Discontents by Sigmund Freud

    This book is a seminal work in the field of psychology, exploring the inherent tension between civilization and the individual. The author, a famed psychologist, argues that civilization's imposition of societal norms and restrictions leads to individual unhappiness and discontent. He delves into the conflict between the human desire for freedom and society's need for order, suggesting that this tension is at the root of much human suffering. The book further explores concepts such as the super-ego, guilt, and the death drive, offering profound insights into the human psyche.

  20. 20. And the Band Played On by Randy Shilts

    This book is a comprehensive chronicle of the emergence of the AIDS epidemic in the United States in the 1980s. It explores how the disease was initially ignored by many health professionals and politicians, leading to its spread and the deaths of thousands of people. The book also examines the impact of the disease on the gay community and the role of various institutions, including the medical community, the media, and the government, in responding to the crisis. It's a powerful critique of the indifference and negligence that allowed the disease to become a global pandemic.

  21. 21. The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell

    This book explores the concept of "tipping points," or the specific moment when an idea, trend, or social behavior crosses a threshold and spreads like wildfire. It delves into the science behind epidemics, both in terms of diseases and ideas, and dissects the factors that can cause a sudden shift in public consciousness. The author uses various case studies, from the sudden popularity of certain shoes to the decrease in New York City's crime rate, to illustrate these concepts.

  22. 22. Burmese Days by George Orwell

    This novel is a scathing critique of British colonial rule in Burma during the 1920s. The protagonist, a disillusioned teak merchant, struggles with the bigotry and racism of his fellow Europeans, and his forbidden love for a Burmese woman. The narrative explores the effects of imperialism on both the oppressors and the oppressed, highlighting the hypocrisy, corruption, and inhumanity that result from such a system.

  23. 23. The Book of Daniel by E. L. Doctorow

    "The Book of Daniel" is a semi-fictional novel that explores the lives of the Isaacson family, specifically focusing on the children, Daniel and Susan, after their parents, accused of being Communists, are executed. The narrative is a combination of historical fiction and a political commentary, providing a deep exploration of the Red Scare in the United States during the Cold War era. The novel is a critical examination of social, political, and familial dynamics in a time of national fear and paranoia.

  24. 24. Arrowsmith by Sinclair Lewis

    The novel follows the life of a bright and dedicated young man, Martin Arrowsmith, who dreams of making significant contributions to medical science. He faces a constant struggle between his ambition and the demands of his professional and personal life. His journey takes him from a small Midwestern town to the prestigious universities of the East Coast, and eventually to a deadly outbreak in the Caribbean. Throughout his journey, he grapples with the corruption, greed, and mediocrity that he finds pervading the medical field, all while trying to remain true to his scientific ideals.

  25. 25. Coming of Age in Samoa by Margaret Mead

    "Coming of Age in Samoa" is a groundbreaking anthropological study that explores adolescence, sexuality, and social norms in Samoan society. The author lived among the Samoans in the 1920s, observing and recording their way of life, particularly focusing on the experiences of teenage girls. The book challenges Western views on sexual morality and the nature versus nurture debate, suggesting that culture plays a significant role in adolescent development and behavior. The author's observations indicate that Samoan teenagers face less stress and confusion than their American counterparts, largely due to their society's relaxed attitudes towards sex and clear societal roles.

Reading Statistics

Click the button below to see how many of these books you've read!

Download

If you're interested in downloading this list as a CSV file for use in a spreadsheet application, you can easily do so by clicking the button below. Please note that to ensure a manageable file size and faster download, the CSV will include details for only the first 500 books.

Download