Pulitzer Prize for History

This is one of the 305 lists we use to generate our main The Greatest Books list.

  • The Hemingses of Monticello by Annette Gordon-Reed

    This book explores the complex and controversial history of Thomas Jefferson's relationship with his slave, Sally Hemings, and her family. It provides a detailed account of the Hemings family's life at Monticello, their interactions with Jefferson, and their experiences during and after his presidency. The narrative also delves into the wider context of slavery, race, and society in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, challenging traditional views and offering a fresh perspective on a well-known historical figure and his time.

    The 10682nd Greatest Book of All Time
  • What Hath God Wrought by Daniel Walker Howe

    This book provides a comprehensive historical account of the United States from 1815 to 1848, a transformative period marked by the significant political, economic, and technological changes that shaped the country's future. The author explores key events such as the War of 1812, the rise of industrialization, the expansion of democracy, and the Mexican-American War. The narrative also delves into the role of religion, the evolution of communications with the invention of the telegraph, and the emergence of a distinct American identity.

    The 11289th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Race Beat by Gene Roberts, Hank Klibanoff

    "The Race Beat" is a historical exploration of the crucial role that the press played in the civil rights movement in the United States. The book delves into the challenges faced by journalists, both white and black, as they covered the struggle for racial equality in the South during the 1950s and 1960s. It highlights the impact of their stories on shaping public opinion and influencing policy changes, while also examining the tactics used by segregationists to control the narrative.

    The 11287th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Polio: An American Story by David M. Oshinsky

    This book provides a comprehensive history of the polio epidemic in America, highlighting the nationwide fear and panic it caused, and the subsequent race to find a cure. It chronicles the journey of scientific discovery, from the early days of the disease, through the development of the Salk and Sabin vaccines, to the eventual eradication of polio. The book also explores the role of politics, philanthropy, and public relations in the fight against polio, and the impact this had on modern medicine and society.

    The 8518th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Jefferson and His Time by Dumas Malone

    "Jefferson and His Time" is a comprehensive six-volume biography that explores the life and legacy of Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States. The series delves into his political philosophy, his role in the formation of America, his relationships, and his personal life. It also examines his contributions to the United States, including his work as the principal author of the Declaration of Independence, his time as president, and his founding of the University of Virginia. The biography is a detailed and insightful examination of one of the most influential figures in American history.

    The 2088th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Battle Cry of Freedom by James M. McPherson

    "Battle Cry of Freedom" is a comprehensive exploration of the events leading up to, during, and following the American Civil War. The book delves into the political, social, and economic factors that led to the war, and examines the strategies, battles, and key figures of this pivotal period in American history. It also provides an in-depth analysis of the consequences of the war and its impact on the United States.

    The 1139th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Parting the Waters by Taylor Branch

    "Parting the Waters" is a comprehensive and engaging chronicle of the civil rights movement in America from 1954 to 1963. It offers an in-depth look into the lives of key figures such as Martin Luther King Jr., and their struggle to end racial segregation and discrimination. The narrative is filled with detailed accounts of major events from the Montgomery Bus Boycott to the March on Washington, providing a vivid picture of this pivotal era in U.S. history.

    The 3055th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Age of Reform by Richard Hofstadter

    This historical analysis explores the political and social changes in the United States from the 1890s to the 1940s, focusing on the Populist and Progressive movements. The author scrutinizes the motivations and accomplishments of reformers during this time, arguing that their efforts were driven more by fears of modernity and changes in society than by altruistic desires for social justice. The book also delves into the impact of these movements on American politics and the ways they shaped the nation's future.

    The 2613th Greatest Book of All Time
  • A Stillness at Appomattox by Bruce Catton

    "A Stillness at Appomattox" is a historical narrative that chronicles the final year of the American Civil War, focusing on the campaigns of Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia during 1864-65, culminating in the surrender of Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House. The book provides an in-depth exploration of the war's end, bringing to life the personalities, strategies, and profound consequences of these pivotal events. It is renowned for its exhaustive research, vivid detail, and eloquent portrayal of the conflict's human element.

    The 10076th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Washington's Crossing by David Hackett Fischer

    This historical work delves into the pivotal event of George Washington crossing the Delaware River during the American Revolutionary War. It provides an in-depth analysis of the strategic decision-making, the hardships faced by the troops in the brutal winter, and the subsequent battles of Trenton and Princeton. The book also explores the impact of these events on the morale of the American forces and the ultimate outcome of the war, painting a vivid picture of this crucial period in American history.

    The 6834th Greatest Book of All Time
  • A Nation under Our Feet by Steven Hahn

    "A Nation Under Our Feet" is a comprehensive study of African American political history during the 19th century, particularly from the Civil War to World War I. The book explores the struggle of African Americans to gain and sustain political power within the American democracy. It highlights their journey from slavery to freedom, the establishment of their own institutions and political movements, and their resistance to both subtle and overt forms of disenfranchisement. The book provides a detailed analysis of the black political consciousness and its impact on the American political landscape.

    The 11285th Greatest Book of All Time
  • An Army at Dawn by Rick Atkinson

    "An Army at Dawn" is a detailed account of the North African campaign during World War II, from the invasion of Morocco and Algeria in November 1942 to the expulsion of Axis powers from Tunisia in May 1943. The book provides an in-depth look at the struggles, victories, and growth of the American and British armies during this period, offering a vivid portrayal of the harsh realities of war and the transformation of a largely untested group of American soldiers into a battle-hardened army.

    The 11284th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Metaphysical Club: A Story of Ideas by Louis Menand

    "The Metaphysical Club: A Story of Ideas" is a historical account of the development of pragmatism, one of America's most significant philosophical movements. The book explores the lives and intellectual journeys of four influential thinkers - Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., William James, Charles Sanders Peirce, and John Dewey. The narrative centers around the Metaphysical Club, a conversational group these men formed in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1872. Through their discussions, they developed the pragmatist belief that ideas are not mere reflections of reality but tools for action and problem-solving. The book also examines how their ideas influenced American thought and policy in areas such as law, education, and social reform.

    The 10062nd Greatest Book of All Time
  • Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation by Joseph Ellis

    The book provides an in-depth exploration of the American Revolution's aftermath, focusing on the lives of the founding fathers and the complex relationships between them. It delves into six key moments in early American history, including the duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, the secret dinner that determined the site of the nation's capital, George Washington's farewell address, John Adams's presidency, and the correspondence between Thomas Jefferson and Adams. The book emphasizes the crucial role of these individuals in shaping the nation's future and the profound impact of their decisions.

    The 10002nd Greatest Book of All Time
  • Freedom From Fear: The American People by David M. Kennedy

    "Freedom From Fear: The American People" is a comprehensive historical analysis of the United States from 1929 to 1945. The book explores the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War II, delving into the social, political, economic, and cultural impacts of these events. It provides a detailed account of the challenges, triumphs, and transformations experienced by the American people during this critical period in history.

    The 11281st Greatest Book of All Time
  • Gotham: A History of New York City by Edwin G. Burrows

    "Gotham: A History of New York City" is an extensive historical account of New York City from its early establishment as a small Dutch trading post to its evolution into a bustling, world-renowned metropolis. The book explores the city's social, political, and economic transformation throughout the centuries, including its role in major historical events such as the Revolutionary War and the Civil Rights Movement. It also delves into the lives of its diverse inhabitants, from the Native Americans and European settlers to the waves of immigrants that have shaped the city's unique culture and identity.

    The 11279th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Summer for the Gods by Edward Larson

    "Summer for the Gods" is a historical account of the 1925 Scopes Trial, also known as the "Monkey Trial," which was a legal case in Tennessee that debated the teaching of evolution in public schools. The book delves into the cultural, political, and intellectual clashes between religious fundamentalism and modernism, highlighting the roles of key figures involved in the trial. It also explores the lasting impact of the trial on American society, particularly in shaping the ongoing debate over the teaching of evolution and creationism in schools.

    The 11278th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Original Meanings by Jack N. Rakove

    This book delves into the political history of the United States, examining the original intent of the Founding Fathers when drafting the Constitution. The author scrutinizes the debates, disagreements, and compromises that shaped the formation of the Constitution, aiming to dispel the notion of a unified vision by the Founding Fathers. Instead, it presents the Constitution as a dynamic, evolving document, shaped by a variety of opinions and interests.

    The 11277th Greatest Book of All Time
  • William Cooper's Town by Alan Taylor

    "William Cooper's Town" is a historical narrative that explores the life of William Cooper, a self-made man who became a judge and congressman in early America. The book delves into the economic, political, and social transformation of America during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, using Cooper's life and the development of Cooperstown, New York as a microcosm. The author also analyzes the impact of Cooper's famous son, a novelist who portrayed the American frontier and its Native American inhabitants.

    The 11275th Greatest Book of All Time
  • No Ordinary Time by Doris Kearns Goodwin

    "No Ordinary Time" is a historical narrative focusing on the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II and the significant role his wife, Eleanor, played during his time in office. The book provides a detailed account of the political, social, and personal dynamics of the Roosevelt White House during this critical period in American history, highlighting the couple's unique partnership and their shared commitment to social reform and the welfare of the American people.

    The 11273rd Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Radicalism of the American Revolution by Gordon S. Wood

    This book explores the American Revolution, not just as a war of independence, but as a radical shift in society and culture that transformed the American people from a monarchy-dependent society to a republic of self-governing citizens. It delves into the deep social changes that occurred, challenging the traditional view of the Revolution as a conservative rebellion, and instead presenting it as a truly radical and transformative event in history. It also details the effects of this transformation on different social classes and groups, from the elite to the common folk, highlighting how it reshaped the political, social, and economic landscape of the nation.

    The 11271st Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Fate of Liberty: Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties by Mark E. Neely, Jr

    This book explores Abraham Lincoln's approach to civil liberties during the American Civil War. It examines the decisions he made that affected individual rights, such as his choice to suspend habeas corpus, allowing the government to arrest and detain individuals without a trial. The author delves into the complexities of Lincoln's decisions, the context in which they were made, and their impact on the country, offering a nuanced view of a president often hailed as a champion of liberty.

    The 11269th Greatest Book of All Time
  • A Midwife's Tale by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

    "A Midwife's Tale" is a historical account of a midwife's life in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, based on her detailed diary entries. The book offers a unique perspective on the daily life, medical practices, and social and economic conditions of the time, while highlighting the significant role that women played in the community, despite their limited rights and opportunities. The narrative also provides a rare insight into the realities of childbirth and women's health during this period.

    The 3423rd Greatest Book of All Time
  • In Our Image: America's Empire in the Philippines by Stanley Karnow

    This book provides a comprehensive historical account of the relationship between the United States and the Philippines, from the time of Spanish colonial rule, through American occupation and its aftermath. It explores the motivations, actions and impacts of American imperialism in the Philippines, highlighting the cultural, political and economic influences that continue to shape the Philippines today. The book also delves into the complex interplay of power, resistance, and collaboration between the Americans and the Filipinos, providing a nuanced understanding of colonialism and its enduring effects.

    The 11262nd Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Launching of Modern American Science, 1846-1876 by Robert V. Bruce

    This book explores the birth and development of modern American science between 1846 and 1876. It details how the United States transformed from a scientifically backward nation into a world leader in scientific research and development. The author delves into the lives and contributions of key figures during this period, including naturalists, inventors, and industrialists. The book also examines the establishment of major scientific institutions and the impact of the Civil War on scientific progress.

    The 11251st Greatest Book of All Time
  • With Americans of Past and Present Days by Jean Jules Jusserand

    "With Americans of Past and Present Days" is a collection of essays that explore the history and culture of the United States, with a focus on the country's relationship with France. The book delves into the lives of key figures in American history, their contributions to the country's development, and their interactions with French culture and politics. The author, a diplomat, offers a unique perspective on the shared history and mutual influence between the two nations.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • A History of the Civil War by James Ford Rhodes

    This book provides an in-depth analysis of the American Civil War, delving into the political, social, and economic factors that led to the conflict. The author explores key events, battles, and figures, offering a comprehensive understanding of the war's causes and consequences. The narrative also examines the role of slavery, the experiences of soldiers, and the strategies of both the Union and Confederate forces, providing a balanced and detailed account of this significant period in American history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The War with Mexico by Justin H. Smith

    "The War with Mexico" is a comprehensive historical analysis of the Mexican-American War from 1846-1848. The book delves into the political, social, and military aspects of the war, providing an in-depth account of the events leading up to the war, the battles fought, and the aftermath. The author critically examines the motivations and actions of both sides, offering a detailed and balanced perspective on this significant period in American history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Victory at Sea by William Sowden Sims

    "The Victory at Sea" is a detailed account of naval operations during World War I, written by a high-ranking naval officer who was deeply involved in the events. The book offers a comprehensive look at the strategies, tactics, and logistics that led to Allied success in the war, as well as the challenges faced by the naval forces. It also provides an insider's perspective on the political and diplomatic maneuverings that shaped the course of the war.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Founding of New England by James Truslow Adams

    "The Founding of New England" is a comprehensive historical analysis of the establishment and growth of New England in the United States. The book delves into the early settlers' challenges, their interactions with Native Americans, the establishment of the colonies, and the political, social, and economic structures that shaped the region. It provides a detailed account of the Puritans' journey, their religious beliefs, and how these beliefs influenced the development of New England. The author's narrative presents a vivid picture of the trials, tribulations, and triumphs that marked the region's early history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Supreme Court in United States History by Charles Warren

    This book offers a comprehensive historical overview of the United States Supreme Court from its inception to the early 20th century. It delves into the evolution of the court's role, its landmark decisions, and its impact on American society. The author provides a detailed analysis of the court's most significant cases, the justices who presided over them, and how their rulings have shaped the nation's legal and political landscape.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The American Revolution: A Constitutional Interpretation by Charles Howard McIlwain

    This book presents a comprehensive analysis of the American Revolution, focusing on its constitutional aspects. The author argues that the Revolution was not just a war for independence, but also a struggle for constitutional rights and principles. He delves into the political and legal conflicts that led to the Revolution, and how these issues shaped the creation of the United States Constitution. The book offers a unique perspective on the American Revolution, viewing it as a constitutional crisis rather than a mere political event.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • History of the American Frontier by Frederic L. Paxson

    "History of the American Frontier" is a comprehensive exploration of the American frontier's evolution from 1763 to 1893. The book delves into the various aspects of the frontier life, including the social, economic, and political changes that took place during this period. It examines the role of pioneers, the impact of the gold rush, the Indian Wars, and the eventual closing of the frontier. The author uses a wealth of primary sources to provide an in-depth understanding of the American frontier, making it a valuable resource for anyone interested in American history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • A History of the United States by Edward Channing

    This book provides a comprehensive and detailed history of the United States, from its early colonial period through to the modern era. It explores key events, significant figures, and important social, economic, and political changes. The author's scholarly approach offers an in-depth understanding of the nation's past, making it a valuable resource for anyone interested in American history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Pinckney's Treaty by Samuel Flagg Bemis

    "Pinckney's Treaty" is an in-depth historical analysis of the 1795 agreement between the United States and Spain, also known as the Treaty of San Lorenzo. The book delves into the geopolitical implications of the agreement, which defined the boundaries between Spanish colonies and the U.S., provided for free navigation of the Mississippi River, and set terms for the prevention of Native American hostilities. It further explores the key figures involved in the negotiation and ratification of the treaty, their motivations, and the lasting impact of the treaty on U.S. territorial expansion and international relations.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Main Currents in American Thought by Vernon L Parrington

    "Main Currents in American Thought" is a comprehensive three-volume analysis of American literature and thought from the pre-colonial period to the early 20th century. The volumes explore the evolution of American philosophy, political ideology, and literature, highlighting the influence of various intellectual movements and their impact on the shaping of American society. The work emphasizes the role of liberal, democratic, and progressive ideas in the formation of American culture and identity.

    The 2630th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Organization and Administration of the Union Army by Fred Albert Shannon

    This book provides an in-depth historical analysis of the organization and administration of the Union Army during the American Civil War. It explores the logistical challenges, bureaucratic structures, recruitment and training processes, and the strategies implemented by the Union leadership. The book depicts not only the military aspects but also the political, economic, and social factors that influenced the Union Army's operations and its ultimate victory.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The War of Independence by Claude H. Van Tyne

    "The War of Independence" is a comprehensive analysis of the American Revolution, providing a detailed account of the events leading up to, during, and following the war. The book covers the political, economic, and social factors that contributed to the uprising, the major battles and strategies, the key figures involved, and the ultimate outcome and its impact on the formation of the United States. The author also explores the broader implications of the war on international relations and the concept of democracy.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Coming of the War, 1914 by Bernadotte E. Schmitt

    "The Coming of the War, 1914" is a comprehensive historical analysis of the factors and events that led to the outbreak of World War I. The author meticulously details the geopolitical tensions, alliances, and conflicts among the European powers in the early 20th century. The book also delves into the roles of key figures and nations, providing a thorough understanding of the complex circumstances that culminated in one of history's most devastating wars.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • My Experiences in the World War by John J. Pershing

    This book is a first-hand account of a high-ranking military officer's experiences during World War I. It provides an in-depth look at the planning, strategy, and execution of military operations, while also offering personal reflections on the war's impact. The author details his interactions with other key figures in the war, giving readers a unique perspective on this historical event.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Significance of Sections in American History by Frederick J. Turner

    This book explores the significance of geographic sections and their influence on American history. The author argues that the unique characteristics of each geographic area, including its natural resources, climate, and topography, have shaped its social, economic, and political development. These sections, in turn, have influenced American history as a whole, from the colonial era to the present day. The book also discusses how these sections have interacted with each other, leading to conflicts and compromises that have further shaped the nation's history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The People's Choice by Herbert Agar

    "The People's Choice" is a historical and political analysis that delves into the American democratic system. The book critically examines the flaws and strengths of democracy, exploring how it has evolved from the time of the Founding Fathers. The author proposes that democracy in its current form is not the best system, suggesting that a meritocracy would be more effective. The book also explores the implications of such a shift on society and the political landscape.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Colonial Period of American History by Charles McLean Andrews

    "The Colonial Period of American History" is a comprehensive study of the early years of America, from the initial colonization by European powers to the establishment of the 13 colonies. The book delves into the social, economic, and political aspects of this era, including the relationships between the colonists and the Native Americans, the development of trade and commerce, and the gradual evolution of political systems. It provides a detailed and nuanced understanding of the roots of American society and the factors that led to the American Revolution.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • A Constitutional History of the United States by Andrew C. McLaughlin

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of the United States Constitution, tracing its history and evolution from its inception to the present day. The author delves into the philosophical underpinnings and political controversies that have shaped the Constitution, examining key amendments, court decisions, and legislative actions. The work also discusses the roles and powers of the three branches of government, the balance of state and federal authority, and the ongoing debates over individual rights and liberties.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Flowering of New England by Van Wyck Brooks

    "The Flowering of New England" is a historical narrative that explores the cultural and intellectual development of New England from 1815 to 1865. It delves into the lives and works of prominent figures of the period, their influences, relationships, and the social and political contexts that shaped their ideas. The book presents a rich tapestry of the literary and artistic scene of the era, capturing the essence of New England's intellectual flowering and its impact on American culture.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Road to Reunion by Paul Herman Buck

    "The Road to Reunion" is a historical examination of the period from 1865 to 1900 in the United States, focusing on the complex process of reunification following the Civil War. The author analyzes the political, social, and economic factors that influenced the reconciliation between the North and the South, including the roles of key figures and the impact of various policies and events. The book provides a detailed and nuanced understanding of this critical period in American history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • A History of American Magazines by Frank Luther Mott

    This comprehensive book provides an in-depth look at the history of American magazines from their inception in the 18th century to the 20th century. It explores the evolution of magazines, their influence on society, and the role they played in shaping and reflecting public opinion. The book also delves into the business aspects of magazine publishing, including advertising, circulation, and editorial changes. It offers valuable insights into the development of journalism and mass communication in the United States.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Abraham Lincoln: The War Years by Carl Sandburg

    This book is a comprehensive biography of Abraham Lincoln, focusing particularly on his leadership during the Civil War. It delves into Lincoln's political strategies, his role in emancipation, and his military leadership, providing a detailed and nuanced portrayal of his presidency. The book also explores Lincoln's personal life and character, offering insights into his relationships and his struggles with depression. It presents a vivid picture of a man who was both a shrewd politician and a deeply human individual, navigating one of the most tumultuous periods in American history.

    The 8168th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Atlantic Migration by Marcus Lee Hansen

    "The Atlantic Migration" is a comprehensive study of European migration to America from 1607 to 1860. The book explores the reasons behind the mass migration, the experiences of the migrants, and the impact of this movement on both the old and new world. It provides a detailed analysis of the social, economic, and political factors that influenced the migration, and how it shaped the development of America. The author also discusses the challenges faced by the migrants and their contributions to the American society and culture.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Reveille in Washington by Margaret Leech

    "Reveille in Washington" is a vivid portrayal of Washington D.C. during the American Civil War. The book offers a detailed account of the city's transformation from a sleepy Southern town to a bustling hub of war activity, filled with soldiers, spies, bureaucrats, and freed slaves. The narrative also explores the social, political, and military life of the city during this tumultuous period, providing a unique perspective on the war and its impact on the nation's capital.

    The 4880th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Paul Revere and the World He Lived In by Esther Forbes

    "Paul Revere and the World He Lived In" is a comprehensive biography that explores the life and times of Paul Revere, a key figure in the American Revolutionary War. The book delves into his career as a silversmith, his role as a courier and patriot, and his participation in the infamous midnight ride. The narrative also gives readers a detailed insight into the social, political, and economic landscape of 18th century Boston, thereby providing a vivid image of the world Revere inhabited.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Growth of American Thought by Merle Curti

    "The Growth of American Thought" is a comprehensive historical analysis of the development of intellectual and social ideologies in the United States, from colonial times to the mid-20th century. The book explores how various factors, including political, economic, and social changes, influenced the evolution of American thought and culture. It provides a detailed examination of the ideas that shaped the nation, the thinkers behind them, and the impact these ideas had on the country's growth and development.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Unfinished Business by Stephen Bonsal

    "Unfinished Business" is a historical account of the author's experiences and observations as a diplomat and journalist in the early 20th century. It provides an in-depth look at the political climate during that time, including the Spanish-American War, the Russo-Japanese War, and World War I. The author shares his personal insights and interactions with key figures of the era, offering readers a unique perspective on the events that shaped the world during this tumultuous time.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Age of Jackson by Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr

    This book provides an in-depth historical analysis of the political and social changes during the era of Andrew Jackson's presidency in the United States. It explores the significant events, policies, and ideologies of the time, including the rise of the Democratic Party, the influence of the "common man" in politics, and the controversial Indian Removal Act. The book also delves into the economic shifts of the period, such as the battle over the Second Bank of the United States, providing a comprehensive overview of this transformative era in American history.

    The 3374th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Scientists Against Time by James Phinney Baxter III

    "Scientists Against Time" is a comprehensive account of the scientific and technological advancements during World War II. The book details how scientists, engineers, and industrialists collaborated to develop new weapons and equipment to aid the war effort. It highlights the creation of radar, the atomic bomb, and other innovations that drastically changed the course of the war. This book underscores the crucial role of science in warfare and the importance of collaboration between different sectors in times of crisis.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Across the Wide Missouri by Bernard A. DeVoto

    "Across the Wide Missouri" is a historical narrative that explores the American fur trade in the 1830s, focusing on the Rocky Mountain fur trade. The book provides a detailed account of the lives of trappers, traders, Native Americans, and the rich ecosystem they inhabited. The narrative is filled with adventure, danger, and the vast beauty of the American West, painting a vivid picture of a pivotal era in American history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Disruption of American Democracy by Roy Franklin Nichols

    "The Disruption of American Democracy" is a comprehensive historical analysis of the period leading up to the American Civil War, focusing on the political, social, and economic factors that led to the conflict. The book explores the deep-seated divisions between the North and South, the role of slavery, and the failure of political compromise in preventing the war. It provides a detailed examination of the political landscape of the time, highlighting the actions and decisions of key figures that contributed to the escalation of tensions.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Art and Life in America by Oliver W. Larkin

    "Art and Life in America" provides an in-depth exploration of the evolution of American art, from the colonial period to the mid-20th century. The book delves into the relationship between American society and its art, examining how cultural, social, and political changes influenced artistic trends. It presents a comprehensive study of various art forms including painting, sculpture, and architecture, offering insights into the diverse cultural influences that shaped American art.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Old Northwest, Pioneer Period 1815-1840 by R. Carlyle Buley

    This book offers a comprehensive historical account of the pioneering period in the Old Northwest region of the United States from 1815 to 1840. It delves into the social, economic, and political developments of the era, shedding light on the lives of the pioneers, their struggles, achievements, and the transformation of the region. The book provides a detailed exploration of the settlement patterns, agricultural practices, transportation systems, and institutions that shaped the region during this period.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Uprooted by Oscar Handlin

    "The Uprooted" is a historical study focusing on the experiences of immigrants who came to the United States from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The book emphasizes the hardships and struggles they faced, including the disorientation and displacement resulting from leaving their homelands, the difficulties of adapting to a new country and culture, and the economic challenges of starting over in a new land. It provides a comprehensive look into the immigrant experience, highlighting the determination and resilience that defined their journey.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Era of Good Feelings by George Dangerfield

    "The Era of Good Feelings" is a historical examination of the United States during the period of 1815-1828, also known as the Era of Good Feelings. This period, marked by a sense of national purpose and a desire for unity among Americans in the aftermath of the War of 1812, is analyzed in detail. The book explores the significant political, social, and economic changes of the time, as well as the key figures and events that shaped the nation during this unique period of American history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Great River: The Rio Grande in North American History by Paul Horgan

    This book provides an in-depth historical account of the Rio Grande, one of North America's significant rivers. The narrative is divided into four parts, each representing a different era in the river's history. The author meticulously explores the indigenous cultures that first inhabited its banks, the Spanish conquest, the Mexican-American War, and the modern development of the river. The book is not just about the river itself, but also about the people, cultures, and events that have shaped its course and the region surrounding it.

    The 8612th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Russia Leaves the War by George F. Kennan

    "Russia Leaves the War" is a comprehensive historical analysis of the political, social, and economic factors that led to Russia's withdrawal from World War I. The book provides a detailed account of the internal struggles, international pressures, and key figures that influenced this critical decision. It also explores the impact of the Russian Revolution and the rise of the Bolsheviks on the nation's foreign policy, offering a nuanced understanding of this pivotal period in world history.

    The 10076th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Banks and Politics in America by Bray Hammond

    "Banks and Politics in America" is a comprehensive historical analysis of the relationship between banking systems and politics in the United States. The book explores how the evolution of banking has shaped the nation's political and economic development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It delves into the origins and growth of banking, the controversies and political battles it sparked, and its influence on America's economic stability and growth. The author provides insightful perspectives on the use of banks as a tool for achieving political and economic goals, and the resulting effects on American society.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Republican Era: 1869-1901 by Leonard D. White, Jean Schneider

    "The Republican Era: 1869-1901" provides a comprehensive examination of the political, social, and economic events that unfolded in the United States during the period of Republican dominance post-Civil War. The authors delve into the policies and ideologies that shaped this era, including the rise of industrialization, the expansion of the railroad system, the growth of big business, and the social and political challenges that came with these changes. The book offers a detailed analysis of the key figures and their roles in shaping this period of American history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • In the Days of McKinley by Margaret Leech

    "In the Days of McKinley" is a comprehensive biography of the 25th President of the United States, William McKinley. The book provides a detailed account of McKinley's personal life, his political career, and the significant events during his presidency, including the Spanish-American War and the annexation of Hawaii. The narrative also delves into the social and political climate of the era, providing a vivid picture of America at the turn of the 20th century. The book ends with the tragic assassination of McKinley, examining its impact on the nation.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Between War and Peace: The Potsdam Conference by Herbert Feis

    This book provides a detailed account of the Potsdam Conference, a crucial event in world history that took place in the summer of 1945. It explores the interactions and negotiations between the three most powerful men of that time - Winston Churchill, Harry Truman, and Joseph Stalin - who were tasked with deciding the fate of post-WWII Europe. The book also delves into the political dynamics, personal conflicts, and the profound implications of the decisions made during this conference.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Triumphant Empire: Thunder-Clouds Gather in the West, 1763-1766 by Lawrence H. Gipson

    "The Triumphant Empire: Thunder-Clouds Gather in the West, 1763-1766" provides a detailed historical analysis of the British Empire during the crucial years of 1763 to 1766. The book focuses on the empire's growth and expansion while also highlighting the emerging tensions and issues that would eventually lead to the American Revolution. The author offers an in-depth look at the political, economic, and social changes of the era, providing a comprehensive understanding of the factors that led to the empire's downfall.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Washington, Village and Capital, 1800-1878 by Constance McLaughlin Green

    This book provides a comprehensive history of Washington D.C. from 1800 to 1878, from its early days as a small village to its development into the nation's capital. The author examines the political, social, and architectural growth of the city, including the construction of significant buildings like the Capitol and the White House. The book also explores the impact of major historical events such as the War of 1812 and the Civil War on the city's evolution.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Puritan Village: The Formation of a New England Town by Sumner Chilton Powell

    This book provides an in-depth study of the establishment and development of a Puritan village in New England during the 17th century. The author meticulously examines the social, political, and economic aspects of the community, shedding light on the intricate interplay of religion, communal cooperation, and individual enterprise that shaped the Puritan society. The book also explores the villagers' interactions with the Native Americans, the challenges they faced, and how they adapted to their new environment, providing a comprehensive understanding of the early American colonial experience.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Greenback Era by Irwin Unger

    "The Greenback Era" is a comprehensive exploration of the post-Civil War economic and political turmoil in the United States, focusing on the era's monetary policy debates. The book delves into the Greenback movement, which advocated for the continued use of paper money not backed by gold or silver to help debtors, and the subsequent economic and political consequences. The narrative provides valuable insights into the complexities of American capitalism, the intersection of politics and economics, and the struggle between different socio-economic classes.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Life of the Mind in America by Perry Miller

    This book is a comprehensive exploration of the intellectual history of America, tracing the development of thought and philosophy from the Puritan era to the mid-twentieth century. It examines the evolution of American intellectual life, providing a detailed look at significant thinkers, their ideas, and the cultural context in which they emerged. The book also underscores the influence of European thought on American intellectualism, highlighting the tensions and synergies between the two.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Exploration and Empire: The Explorer and the Scientist in the Winning of the American West by William H. Goetzmann

    The book discusses the exploration and scientific discovery that took place during the expansion of the American West. It highlights the role of explorers and scientists in shaping the American empire, arguing that their endeavors were not just about territorial acquisition but also the pursuit of knowledge. The book delves into the lives and contributions of notable figures, providing a comprehensive view of the westward expansion era, its challenges, and its lasting impact on America.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution by Bernard Bailyn

    This book is a comprehensive study of the political thought that influenced the American Revolution. It explores the diverse ideological currents that shaped the founding fathers' thinking, including radical Whig theories, classical republicanism, and Enlightenment philosophy. The author argues that these ideas were not merely adopted from European thinkers, but were significantly transformed by the unique circumstances of the American colonies. The book also emphasizes the importance of these ideological origins in understanding the American Revolution as a radical event that fundamentally reshaped American society and politics.

    The 8612th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Origins of the Fifth Amendment by Leonard W. Levy

    This book explores the history and origins of the Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution, which protects individuals from self-incrimination among other rights. The author delves into the legal, political, and social contexts that led to the amendment's creation, providing a comprehensive analysis of its significance in the American legal system. The book also examines the amendment's influence on the concept of individual rights and its impact on subsequent legal developments.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Present at the Creation by Dean Acheson

    This memoir offers an in-depth examination of American diplomacy and foreign policy during the early Cold War era. Penned by a former Secretary of State, it provides first-hand accounts of significant historical events like the Marshall Plan, the formation of NATO, and the Korean War. It not only provides a detailed account of the author's time in office but also offers his insights and perspectives on the geopolitical shifts of the time, making it a valuable resource for understanding the complexities of international relations during a critical period in world history.

    The 3396th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Roosevelt: The Soldier Of Freedom by James MacGregor Burns

    This book provides an in-depth exploration of Franklin D. Roosevelt's life during his presidential tenure, particularly focusing on his role during World War II. It delves into his strategies, policies, and the critical decisions he made that shaped the world during this turbulent era. The book also explores his relationships with key figures like Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin, his health challenges, and his vision for a post-war world, painting a comprehensive picture of his leadership during one of the most critical periods in global history.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Neither Black Nor White by Carl N. Degler

    "Neither Black Nor White" is a comprehensive historical analysis of racial relations in Brazil and the United States. The book compares and contrasts the racial policies and societal attitudes in the two countries, arguing that Brazil's more fluid concept of race and less rigid segregation policies have resulted in a significantly different racial climate compared to the United States. The author uses historical data and sociological studies to support these claims, providing an in-depth look at the complexities of race relations in both countries.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • People of Paradox by Michael Kammen

    "People of Paradox" is an in-depth study of American culture and the inherent contradictions within it. The book explores the paradoxes that exist in various aspects of American life, including politics, art, and social behavior. It offers a historical perspective, tracing these contradictions from the time of the country's founding to the present day. The author provides a thought-provoking analysis of how these paradoxes have shaped the national identity and continue to influence American society.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Americans: The Democratic Experience by Daniel J. Boorstin

    "The Americans: The Democratic Experience" delves into the social, political, and cultural evolution of America, focusing on the period from the end of the Civil War to the early 20th century. The book explores the impact of the democratic experience on various aspects of American life, including business, technology, and the arts. It also examines how the democratic experience shaped American identity and values, and influenced the country's growth and development.

    The 11112th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Lamy of Santa Fe by Paul Horgan

    "Lamy of Santa Fe" is a historical biography that tells the story of Jean-Baptiste Lamy, a French Catholic priest who became the first Archbishop of Santa Fe, New Mexico. The book explores his life and work, including his efforts to build the Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi, his conflicts with local clergy, and his role in the cultural and religious evolution of the region. The narrative provides a comprehensive look at the history of the American Southwest during the 19th century.

    The 11211th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Impending Crisis, 1841-1867 by David M. Potter

    "The Impending Crisis, 1841-1867" provides an in-depth examination of the events leading up to the American Civil War. The author meticulously explores the political, economic, and social factors that contributed to the escalating tensions between the North and South, including the divisive issues of slavery and states' rights. The book also sheds light on the key figures and events of the era, offering a comprehensive understanding of this critical period in American history.

    The 11217th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Visible Hand by Alfred D. Chandler, Jr

    "The Visible Hand" is a comprehensive historical analysis of the rise and evolution of the modern corporation. The author argues that the development of large-scale business organizations was a consequence of the expanding capitalist economies in the 19th and 20th centuries. The book explores how these corporations replaced the market mechanisms with managerial hierarchies, thus becoming the dominant economic institutions. It also discusses the impact of these changes on economic growth and productivity.

    The 11219th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Dred Scott Case by Don E. Fehrenbacher

    This book provides an in-depth analysis of the Dred Scott case, a significant event in American history that heightened tensions between the North and South, leading up to the Civil War. The author meticulously examines the political, social, and legal contexts surrounding the case, the individuals involved, and the controversial Supreme Court decision that ruled African Americans were not citizens and could not sue in federal court. The book further explores the case's profound impact on the nation, contributing to the secession of Southern states and the onset of the Civil War.

    The 11225th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Been in the Storm So Long by Leon F. Litwack

    "Been in the Storm So Long" provides an in-depth look into the experiences of African Americans during the Civil War and Reconstruction era. The book vividly illustrates the transition from slavery to freedom, focusing on the struggles and resilience of former slaves as they sought to establish their place in a society that had long oppressed them. It delves into the emotional, economic, and political changes that took place during this period and how they affected the lives of African Americans, both individually and collectively.

    The 11227th Greatest Book of All Time
  • American Education: The National Experience, 1783-1876 by Lawrence A. Cremin

    This book provides a comprehensive history of American education from the period of 1783 to 1876. It delves into the development of educational institutions and ideologies during this time, exploring the influence of various social, political, and economic factors. The narrative chronicles the transformation of American education from a primarily local and private endeavor to a more centralized and public system, highlighting the role of key figures and movements in this process. The book also analyzes the impact of these changes on American society and culture at large.

    The 11228th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Mary Chestnut's Civil War by Mary Chesnut

    "Mary Chestnut's Civil War" is a personal diary documenting the experiences of a prominent Southern woman during the American Civil War. The author provides a vivid account of the social, political, and personal upheavals of the era, revealing the harsh realities of slavery, the fear and uncertainty of war, and the complex dynamics of Southern society. Her unique perspective and keen observations offer a valuable historical record of this tumultuous time in American history.

    The 4496th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Transformation of Virginia, 1740-1790 by Rhys L. Isaac

    "The Transformation of Virginia, 1740-1790" explores the social, cultural, and political changes in Virginia during the second half of the 18th century. The book provides a detailed account of how the state evolved from a British colony with a rigid social hierarchy and an economy based on tobacco farming and slavery, to a more democratic society with a more diversified economy. It also examines the impact of the American Revolution on Virginia, including the disestablishment of the Anglican Church, the end of primogeniture, and the gradual abolition of slavery.

    The 11236th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Prophets of Regulation by Thomas K. McCraw

    "Prophets of Regulation" delves into the history and evolution of regulatory policy in the United States. The book focuses on the lives and contributions of four influential figures in regulatory theory and practice: Charles Francis Adams, Louis D. Brandeis, James M. Landis, and Alfred E. Kahn. The author explores their ideologies, their impact on policy, and the lasting implications of their work on the American regulatory landscape. The book presents a comprehensive analysis of the interplay between economics, politics, and law in shaping regulatory policies.

    The 11238th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Heavens and the Earth by Walter A. McDougall

    "The Heavens and the Earth" explores the history of the Space Age, focusing on the political, cultural, and technological developments that led to the exploration of space. It delves into the Cold War rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union and how it fueled the space race. The book also examines the role of governments, private industry, and popular opinion in shaping the trajectory of space exploration. It provides a comprehensive view of how the Space Age has influenced and been influenced by broader societal trends.

    The 11247th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Voyagers to the West: A Passage in the Peopling of America on the Eve of the Revolution by Bernard Bailyn

    This historical work delves into the mass migration from Britain to the American colonies during the 1770s, just prior to the American Revolution. Using sources such as ship registers, official reports, and personal letters, the book presents an in-depth study of the motivations, experiences, and impact of these immigrants on the shaping of early American society. The study also explores the British government's role in encouraging this migration and its impact on the impending revolution.

    The 11249th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World by Liaquat Ahamed

    The book offers an in-depth analysis of the events leading up to the Great Depression from the perspective of four central bankers from the United States, Britain, France, and Germany. The author argues that these individuals, through their decision-making and policies, inadvertently contributed to the economic turmoil of the 1930s. The book provides a historical examination of the global financial system, monetary policy, and the role of central banks, ultimately highlighting the human factor in economic catastrophes.

    The 7903rd Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery by Eric Foner

    This book explores Abraham Lincoln's complex relationship with the institution of slavery, tracing his evolution from a moderate who sought to gradually abolish slavery to a radical who believed in immediate emancipation. It delves into his personal, political, and public life, his speeches, and his private correspondence to reveal a man grappling with the moral, legal, and social implications of slavery in a nation founded on the principle of freedom. The book provides a detailed examination of Lincoln's role in the abolition of slavery and the Civil War, offering a nuanced understanding of his legacy.

    The 11292nd Greatest Book of All Time
  • Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable

    This biography provides an in-depth exploration of Malcolm X's life, from his early days of crime and imprisonment to his transformation into one of the most influential African-American leaders. It delves into his complex relationships, his evolving political beliefs, and his controversial views on race and religion. The book also examines his assassination, shedding new light on the circumstances around his death and the conspiracy theories that followed.

    The 8196th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam by Fredrik Logevall

    "Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam" is a comprehensive examination of the political and military events that led to the Vietnam War. The book explores the collapse of French colonial rule in Vietnam, the rise of the Viet Minh, and the subsequent involvement of the United States. The author critically analyzes the decisions made by key figures and the consequences of these actions, providing a detailed account of the historical events that shaped America's longest war.

    The 11295th Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832 by Alan Taylor

    "The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832" examines the impact of slavery and war on Virginia from the late 18th to early 19th century. It highlights the role of slaves who sought freedom by allying with British forces during the War of 1812, causing a significant internal threat to the slaveholding society. The book also explores the aftermath of these events, including the tightening of slave laws and the increasing fear of slave rebellions.

    The 11296th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Encounters at the Heart of the World by Elizabeth A. Fenn

    This historical book delves into the rich and vibrant history of the Mandan Indians, a Native American tribe from the Great Plains region of the United States. The book details their complex agricultural society, their interactions with European explorers and traders, and the devastating impact of smallpox epidemics on their population. The narrative provides a comprehensive and vivid account of the tribe's cultural practices, social structures, and their resilience in the face of adversity.

    The 11298th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Custer's Trials by T. J. Stiles

    "Custer's Trials" is a biography that delves into the life and character of George Armstrong Custer, a United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the American Civil War and the American Indian Wars. The book provides a detailed account of Custer's life, from his childhood to his military career, and his ultimate demise at the Battle of Little Bighorn. It also explores his personal life, including his marriage to Libbie Bacon and his controversial relationships with Native American women. The book offers a nuanced view of Custer, portraying him as a complex, often contradictory figure who was both a product of his time and a man who defied societal norms.

    The 11300th Greatest Book of All Time
  • Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy by Heather Ann Thompson

    This book provides a comprehensive account of the 1971 Attica Prison Uprising and its aftermath. It reveals the horrific conditions that led to the prisoners' revolt, the violent retaking of the prison, and the prolonged legal battles that followed. The book also explores the cover-ups and corruption that pervaded the event and its handling, and how it influenced the national conversation about mass incarceration. It's a critical study of civil rights, law enforcement, and the U.S. justice system.

    The 11303rd Greatest Book of All Time
  • The Gulf: The Making of An American Sea by Jack E. Davis

    This book provides an in-depth exploration of the Gulf of Mexico's history, from its geological formation to the present day. It highlights the Gulf's significance in American history and culture, its rich biodiversity, and the environmental challenges it faces due to human activities. The narrative also underscores the Gulf's economic importance, including its role in the petroleum industry, fishing, and tourism. It is a comprehensive study of the Gulf's multifaceted nature, its environmental and economic value, and its enduring influence on American society.

    The 11306th Greatest Book of All Time
About this list

Pulitzer Prize, 106 Books

The Pulitzer Prize for History has been awarded since 1917 for a distinguished book upon the history of the United States. Many history books have also been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction and Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography.

Two people have won the Pulitzer Prize for History twice; Margaret Leech, for Reveille in Washington, 1860-1865 in 1941 and In the Days of McKinley in 1960, and Bernard Bailyn, for The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution (1968) and Voyagers to the West: A Passage in the Peopling of America on the Eve of the Revolution (1987).

Added over 10 years ago.

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